Child poverty, the NDP and how we vote: How politics touched Canadians this week

Heather Scoffield, Ottawa Bureau Chief, The Canadian Press

Published Friday, November 25, 2016 5:18PM EST

OTTAWA — The prime minister was out of town most of the week — winding up a trade-focused trip to South America and gearing up for an aid-focused trip to Africa — but the pace of politicking was relentless all the same.

Whether it was phasing out coal, cracking down on vaping or buying fighter jets; limiting medicinal pot for veterans, fretting about Liberal fundraising or coming to grips with suicide in the military, the news hurricane on Parliament Hill was relentless.

And that doesn’t even include the problem of child poverty, the leadership dynamics within the NDP and new steps on democratic reform.

Here are three ways politics this week will have a lasting effect on Canadians:

CHILD POVERTY

The number-crunchers at Campaign 2000, a group that advocates for the eradication of child poverty, say one out …
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Before Justin Trudeau, Wilfrid Laurier ruled as Canada’s rock star PM

Laurier’s legacy on our streets and pop culture
What’s in a name? Well, the buildings, monuments and other items named for Canada’s seventh prime minister include:
– Ottawa’s Fairmont Chateau Laurier
– Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ont.
– Laurier Avenue in Ottawa
– The Sir Wilfrid Laurier School Board in Rosemere, Que.
– The Sir Wilfrid Laurier action figure, part of the Canadian Legends series sold by www.cmdstore.com.   

A Canadian prime minister fascinates the world’s media, grabbing their attention as much for his good looks and impeccable fashion sense as his political smarts and presence on the international stage.
In 2016, this can be applied to Justin Trudeau and the paparazzi’s obsession with his shirtless abs. But it was Sir Wilfrid Laurier — Canada’s prime minister from 1896 to 1911 — who was Canada’s first rock star PM.
“The late 19th and early 20th centuries were very much dominated …
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After Amartya Sen ouster, Nalanda Chancellor George Yeo quits: Politics, rather not be in it

Written by Shubhajit Roy
| New Delhi |
Updated: November 26, 2016 6:03 am

Singapore’s George Yeo with Sen: ‘Dissolution of old Nalanda board came as a complete surprise to me’
Four days after Nobel laureate Amartya Sen was dropped from the governing board of Nalanda University, Chancellor George Yeo, a former Singapore foreign minister, submitted his resignation to President Pranab Mukherjee as a mark of protest.
Elaborating on the reasons behind his resignation, in a statement sent to The Indian Express and in a Facebook post, Yeo said he was not consulted about dissolution of the board, and that the sudden move was “bound up with Indian domestic politics”.

Yeo’s decision was conveyed in an email sent to members of the governing board on Friday morning, days after Sen’s nine-year association with the university was terminated by the government on November 21.
The Indian Express had first reported on the government’s …
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Remarks for the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change at the Toronto Region Board of Trade

Friday, November 25, 2016

Check against delivery. This speech has been translated in accordance with the Government of Canada’s official languages policy and edited for posting and distribution in accordance with its communications policy.

I would like to begin by acknowledging that the land we are on is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (HO-Dehn-Oh-show-knee), the Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Indigenous peoples are the first stewards of our water, air, and land, and we must work in partnership to protect our environment.

Thank you, everyone, for the warm welcome. It’s great to be back. The Board of Trade is a longtime pillar of the Canadian business community and a cornerstone to the success of this great city.

Our world has come a long way since the Board of Trade was created in the 1850s, on the dusty streets of Toronto.

First of all, we live, on …
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Remarks for the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. Frankly and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you are affiliated with this page and would like it removed please contact pressreleases@franklyinc.comSOURCE Environment and Climate Change CanadaToronto Region Board of Trade – Check against delivery

TORONTO, Nov. 25, 2016 /CNW/ –

[Introduction]

I would like to begin by acknowledging that the land we are on is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (HO-Dehn-Oh-show-knee), the Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.  

Indigenous peoples are the first stewards of our water, air, and land, and we must work in partnership to protect our environment.

[Pause]

Thank you, everyone, for the warm welcome. It’s great to be back. The Board of Trade is a longtime pillar of the Canadian business community and a cornerstone to the success of this great city.   


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More delusions of Canadian grandeur follow Trump election

As the days have ticked past since the U.S. election, its implications, especially for the media, have been interpreted with agonizing slowness. The polls, so inaccurate, yet uniformly revealed public disrespect for the press. Ninety per cent of conventional media was hostile to Trump and 90 per cent of polling organizations predicted a comfortable Clinton victory. As there was no substantive argument for the re-election of the Democrats, their entire campaign was to slag off Trump. The servile media deluged Trump’s followers with disparagements, and generally signed on to Clinton’s dismissal of 30 million Trump supporters as a “basket of deplorables.” Trump pointed to the press sections at his heavily attended meetings and drew down on them crescendos of brickbats and fist-shaking hostility.
Trump was running against the Bush-McCain-Romney traditional Republicans, the Cruz far-right Republicans, the Clinton-Obama long-term management of the Democrats and the quasi-Marxist Sanders left of the …
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Canada's Marineland faces animal cruelty charges

A Canadian wildlife park has been charged with five counts of animal cruelty – including allowing a peacock to be in distress.Marineland, in Niagara Falls, was also charged with failing to provide adequate food and water for 35 bears, the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (OSPCA) said.Three final charges relate to failing to comply with the prescribed standards of care for a peacock and guinea hens.Marineland deny the allegations.The company told the BBC the accusations were made by “a former animal care worker who was fired for poor performance and inappropriate behaviour”.It …
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Missing Cold War nuclear bomb remains a mystery after Canadian navy investigates object found by diver

A Cold War nuclear bomb is still missing after it turned out a diver’s underwater discovery was not the atomic weapon weapon as first thought. 
The mystery of a “missing nuke” in Canada has baffled historians for more than half a century. 
Ever since an American B-36 Bomber crashed near British Columbia during a secret training mission in 1950, the nuclear bomb on board has never been found. 
Earlier this month, a commercial diver raised hopes that the Mark IV bomb had been discovered after he stumbled across an object in the waters off Canada’s west coast. 
“I found something really …
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Big Mac at 35,000ft? The Canadian airline taking McDonald's to new heights

McDonald’s coffee can now be ordered on a plane in a move that could pave the way for air passengers to tuck into a Big Mac at 35,000 feet.
The fast food giant has agreed a deal with Canadian airline WestJet to offer its McCafé Premium Roast on-board the carrier’s entire fleet, with the debut beverage poured last week on its Toronto to Calgary route. The roll-out to the rest of Westjet’s Boeing 737 and 767 aircraft will start next month, after which all passengers will be offered a McCafé as one of their complimentary drinks.
Adjusting to how altitude …
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