B.C. urges federal government crackdown on real estate tax cheats

Several critics are joining the B.C. government in urging Ottawa to crack down on tax cheaters and toughen existing rules, after a Globe and Mail investigation uncovered possible tax evasion and fraud by real estate speculators in Vancouver’s overpriced market.The province’s Finance Minister called on the Canada Revenue Agency Saturday to “diligently” enforce the law, indicating he will pressure his federal counterpart, Finance Minister Bill Morneau, to make improvements.

On Sunday, Mr. Morneau’s office referred all questions to the Canada Revenue Agency. The Globe also asked to speak to the minister responsible for the CRA, Diane Lebouthillier, but she was not available.Read more: Vancouver real estate speculators taking advantage of loopholes and lax oversightThe Globe investigation revealed how real estate speculator Kenny Gu paid next to nothing in taxes last year, while millions of dollars flowed through his personal and corporate bank accounts.Documents …
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Canada's First Nations have enjoyed a long and fruitful association with the monarchy

The following is an edited excerpt of a talk given by John Fraser at an exhibition of Charles Pachter’s paintings at the historic London Charterhouse, the only extant building left in London where Queen Elizabeth I held court, on Aug. 18.
In the beginning, in Canada, there was just the aboriginal population. Then the French came at the start of the 17th century and, in the name of the king of France, set up trading relations with the aboriginal people, who, soon enough, turned into three main groups: the ones we now call First Nations, the Inuit in the Far North and the Metis — or people of mixed race — all along the trading routes. The French developed a variety of informal treaties, or trading understandings, with the aboriginal population. Then the British came in the name of their king and defeated the French in 1759. That produced some revamped loyalties with …
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Michael Den Tandt: Nativism in the U.S. and Canada has become one of the sad legacies of 9/11

Fifteen years after 9/11 we continue to feel the aftershocks. They are present in the U.S. presidential campaign. They are present in Ottawa, as Canadian politicians begin to grapple, belatedly, with populist nativism. Remembered daily or put out of mind, the attacks on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon resonate everywhere and change everything, still.
It’s unclear at this juncture that world leaders — even the most powerful – have much control of the aftermath even now, or more than a very bleary idea of what to do about it. Like the rest of us they’re hanging on, clinging to the life buoy, praying for calm. Except for the predatory few, the Donald Trumps, Nigel Farages and Marine Le Pens, who’ve tried to catch a wave.
To understand what connects the murders of 2,996 people on that bright, awful morning to the rise of Trump and the “alt right” 15 years …
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Canada’s peacekeeping mission in Africa will use force if necessary to protect civilians: defence minister

Minister of National Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan speaks with the media on Parliament Hill in a file photoMembers of the UN-African Union mission in Darfur (UNAMID) patrol the area near the city of Nyala in Sudan’s Darfur on January 12, 2015A soldier of the United Nations mission to Mali standing guard near a UN vehicle near Kidal, northern MaliOTTAWA — Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan says protecting civilians — by force if needed — will be central to any Canadian peacekeeping mission in Africa, and that Canada will expect troops from partner countries to operate on the same principle.In an interview with The Canadian Press, Sajjan said he is concerned that despite having “robust” mandates and rules of engagement to act, peacekeepers from some countries have failed to intervene in cases where civilians have been attacked.The willingness of prospective partners to act when required is one factor being considered as the Liberal government …
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Nativism in the U.S. and Canada has become one of the sad legacies of 9/11

Fifteen years after 9/11 we continue to feel the aftershocks. They are present in the U.S. presidential campaign. They are present in Ottawa, as Canadian politicians begin to grapple, belatedly, with populist nativism. Remembered daily or put out of mind, the attacks on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon resonate everywhere and change everything, still.
It’s unclear at this juncture that world leaders — even the most powerful – have much control of the aftermath even now, or more than a very bleary idea of what to do about it. Like the rest of us they’re hanging on, clinging to the life buoy, praying for calm. Except for the predatory few, the Donald Trumps, Nigel Farages and Marine Le Pens, who’ve tried to catch a wave.
To understand what connects the murders of 2,996 people on that bright, awful morning to the rise of Trump and the “alt right” 15 years …
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Politics › Japan pushing 'quality' aid to counter China's clout in ASEAN

TOKYO —
Unable to match dollar-for-dollar China’s massive investment in Southeast Asia, Japan’s future relevance in the region appears to hinge on it convincingly offering a “quality over quantity” approach.

Signs the Japanese government has picked up on this strategy could be seen in Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s packed diary during a series of gatherings connected to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in the Laotian capital Vientiane last week.

In a summit with ASEAN leaders, Abe stressed Japan’s resolve to continue to support enhanced economic integration in the 10-nation bloc with “high-quality” infrastructure investment.

“For Japan, it’s a race…it’s about investment and trade, and in every aspect China is forging ahead and trying to leave Japan behind, and Japan is trying to play a catch-up role,” said Purnendra Jain, professor of Asian Studies at the University of Adelaide.

During a flurry of bilateral …
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Canada’s peacekeeping mission in Africa will use force if necessary …

Minister of National Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan speaks with the media on Parliament Hill in a file photoMembers of the UN-African Union mission in Darfur (UNAMID) patrol the area near the city of Nyala in Sudan’s Darfur on January 12, 2015A soldier of the United Nations mission to Mali standing guard near a UN vehicle near Kidal, northern MaliOTTAWA — Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan says protecting civilians — by force if needed — will be central to any Canadian peacekeeping mission in Africa, and that Canada will expect troops from partner countries to operate on the same principle.In an interview with The Canadian Press, Sajjan said he is concerned that despite having “robust” mandates and rules of engagement to act, peacekeepers from some countries have failed to intervene in cases where civilians have been attacked.The willingness of prospective partners to act when required is one factor being considered as the Liberal government …
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Canada may grant easier residency for foreign workers

Canada may make it easier for temporary foreign workers to get permanent residency and eventual citizenship, Immigration Minister John McCallum said on Sunday. Speaking on CTV television’s “Question Period,” a national politics talk show, McCallum did not give details, saying he was waiting for a parliamentary report on the matter to be introduced in September. Canada’s Liberal government has said it is revamping the program, which brings in workers who are often in low-skilled positions. Local unions have criticized it for depressing wages and affecting Canadian jobs, and workers and advocacy groups have complained of poor conditions and rights violations. The workers already have paths to permanent residency that have been criticized as too difficult. When asked whether Canada will consider loosening the rules, McCallum said the government “is certainly considering providing a pathway to permanent residence” to the workers. “We think that those who come, in general, …
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Friends and foes alike don't see Canada as unbiased on Ukraine, experts say

When the U.S., France, Germany, Britain and Italy talked with Ukraine about the meltdown in security there in 2014, the door was closed on Stephen Harper.
That was news.
The Conservatives had worked very hard to convince everyone — friend and foe alike — that Canada was Ukraine’s best friend and the optics of being left on the sidelines at the NATO summit in Wales two years ago was unmistakable.

“We have been seen as a party to the conflict.”
– Piotr Dutkiewicz, political science professor at Carleton University and Russia expert

It was, however, a footnote in the day’s coverage, coming as it did on the same day that the former Conservative prime minister announced the first special forces deployment to Iraq to counter ISIS fighters there.
Contrast that with the amount of ink spilled last week after the G20, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was not invited to a meeting …
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Stephen Harper to join law firm in Calgary

Former prime minister Stephen Harper, who resigned his seat in Parliament to pursue a new career in international business consulting, is set to join Dentons LLP’s Calgary office, sources say.The massive global law firm, which counts former Liberal prime minister Jean Chrétien as one of its most prominent lawyers, has offices across Canada and around the world – including Shanghai, London and Washington. Mr. Harper’s work at Dentons will dovetail with his newly established international business consulting practice.

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