Canada's energy business puts indigenous women, girls at risk, report says

By Ellen Wulfhorst

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Indigenous women and girls in northern Canada live in danger due to rampant development that has brought crime, ratcheted up the cost of living and destroyed traditional ways of life, Amnesty International said on Thursday.

The governments of Canada and British Columbia province fail to protect the thousands of indigenous people living in areas with intensive oil and gas extraction, coal mining and hydropower development, the human rights group said in a report.

“Unbridled resource development in this region is creating an environment where indigenous women and girls are confronted with levels of extreme violence that are shocking and pervasive,” Erika Guevara Rosas, Americas regional director for Amnesty International, said in a statement.

“The fact that these deeply troubling realities are not being addressed and prioritized when policy makers take decisions on resource development is a grave and troubling failure on …

How the Clintons are tied to Canada’s corporate elite

It was the plane ride that launched a thousand good deeds, and one lingering controversy.
One day in June, 2005, Bill Clinton clambered aboard the private jet of Frank Giustra, the Vancouver mining financier. Mr. Clinton needed to get to Mexico City to begin a speaking tour of Latin America and oversee the work of his sprawling charitable enterprise. The two men didn’t know each other well. But Mr. Giustra happened to have a luxury MD-87 aircraft to get him there. And he was curious about the former U.S. president and his philanthropic work.
The trip and the conversation marked the beginning of a long and mutually beneficial relationship. Soon after, Mr. Giustra became one of the largest single donors to the Clinton Foundation and rallied an entire industry to raise millions of dollars for its fight against global poverty. He, in turn, gained entrée to Mr. Clinton’s …

New system for funding Canadian content would rely on tax credits

Canada desperately needs an update to its cultural policies but, like many Liberal initiatives, the review announced last spring by Minister of Canadian Heritage Mélanie Joly feels pretty mushy. To date, the consultations about nurturing Canadian-content creation seem mainly to have produced pieties about the digital age but few concrete suggestions.

Enter Richard Stursberg, former CBC executive and Telefilm chief executive officer. Commissioned by Rogers Communications Inc. to consider the issues, Stursberg has come up with his own bold plan to remake the funding system for Canadian content. Presenting his report “Cultural Policy for the Digital Age” at the University of Ottawa’s Centre for Law, Technology and Society Wednesday, Stursberg unveiled three pillars of agnosticism.Sounds like an ancient Greek philosophy – or perhaps a style of architecture – but what it refers to is a system that funds Canadian creation regardless of its platform, its producer or its content. His …

Trumpism doesn’t play in Canada, which just eased takeover rules

OTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, bucking a global trend toward greater protectionism, will loosen foreign takeover rules for more than 50 Canadian publicly traded companies next year, including those in mining, oil and marijuana production.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced this week Canada would raise the threshold for automatic government review of acquisitions to C$1-billion ($747-million) in enterprise value in 2017, rather than 2019 as previously scheduled. The hike from the current C$600-million will be enacted through legislation, although the timing has not been set. Companies that fall under the new threshold range from miner Dominion Diamond to marijuana producer Canopy Growth.Advertisement

The changes are the latest border-opening steps by Trudeau, who has emerged as a champion of expanding trade and globalisation at a time when protectionism has fuelled the rise of Donald Trump, support for Brexit and opposition to trade pacts – such as Canada’s with the European Union, …

Canadian Shaw Taking Opposite Approach Of U.S. Counterparts

Shaw Communications Inc. (NYSE:SJR) reported its fourth quarter and fiscal year-end earnings on November 2, 2016 for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2016. During the quarter, the company continued to lose video consumer cable and satellite subscribers (22,171 and 6,332 respectively). The company also lost 18,492 consumer land-line phone subscribers.The brighter spots were an increase in consumer internet subscribers of 10,341, and almost 40,000 new WIND mobile Subscribers, which I will discuss further below. Prior to this earnings announcement, I wrote about the challenges the company faces as it attempts to become Canada’s fourth major mobile carrier. The three leading mobile providers in Canada are Rogers Communications Inc. (NYSE:RCI), Bell Wireless (a unit of BCE Inc.) (NYSE:BCE), and TELUS Corporation (NYSE:TU). Earlier this year, Shaw closed a series of transactions that are in stark contrast to recent transactions south of the border. The result of these transactions is that for the most recent …

Canada allows more foreign investment in airlines, wants competition

(Adds comments from low-cost startups, rewrites top)By Allison Lampert Nov 3 Canada will lift foreign
investment limits for Canadian airlines to 49 percent from 25
percent, a change that should spur competition and lower fares
by encouraging the launch of low-cost airlines, its transport
minister said on Thursday.Air Canada shares fell 3.2 percent while WestJet
Airlines Ltd slipped 1.4 percent following the news,
though analysts said a flood of new low-cost competitors is
unlikely given the country’s high aviation taxes and charges.Consumer advocates have long complained that limited
competition, high fares and airport fees make Canada a
comparatively expensive country for air travel.”I expect fares to go down because of competition, and I
expect more destination choices for Canadians,” Transport
Minister Marc Garneau said in Montreal.The rules still prohibit a foreign individual or single
group of international investors from owning more than 25
percent of a Canadian carrier.WestJet Chief Executive …

Canada court says country's spy agency illegally retained data

By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) – A court dealt Canada’s spy agency a blow on Thursday, declaring it had illegally kept data collected during investigations over the past decade and threatening sanctions if the issue occurred again.

Although judges have previously criticized the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS, for a lack of openness about its operations, the ruling was particularly uncompromising.

Federal Court Judge Simon Noel said CSIS secretly set up a special data analysis center in 2006 to help track potential terrorism suspects. The agency stored electronic information from people not linked to particular threats, which is referred to …
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Canada court deals blow to spy agency, says it kept data illegally

By David Ljunggren
| OTTAWA

OTTAWA A court dealt Canada’s spy agency a blow on Thursday, declaring it had illegally kept data collected during investigations over the past decade and threatening sanctions if the issue occurred again.Although judges have previously criticized the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS, for a lack of openness about its operations, the ruling was particularly uncompromising.Federal Court Judge Simon Noel said CSIS secretly set up a special data analysis centre in 2006 to help track potential terrorism suspects. The agency stored electronic information from people not linked to particular threats, which is referred to as …
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Negotiations halt between Rugby Canada and U.S. pro league

Talks to add Canadian teams to Pro Rugby North America have broken down.The Pro Rugby league, founded by New York financier Doug Schoninger, debuted this year with teams in Denver, Ohio, Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco. There had been expectations that Canada would soon join the league.Rugby Canada chief executive Allen Vansen said that while there was disagreement over a number of issues, an exclusivity clause that would have prevented Rugby Canada from sanctioning any other professional rugby organization was the primary stumbling block.

“Rugby Canada greatly appreciates the investment Mr. Schoninger and Pro Rugby are making …
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