Thousands Of Canadian ‘Deplorables’ March To Support Trump And Oppose Trudeau

They might not achieve one million participants, but the numbers were already building towards 5,000 Saturday morning. As one organizer, Mike Wain put it: “I was hoping for a million but I guess this will do.”

Million Canadian Deplorables March organizer Mike Wain stands in front of Canada's Parliament Hill. Daily Caller photo

Million Canadian Deplorables March organizer Mike Wain stands in front of Canada’s Parliament Hill. (Photo: Daily Caller)

They had come to protest the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in general but they weren’t without specific grievances against a regime that they say overtaxes, overspends and is a clear and present danger to free speech. They began their march on Parliament Hill in Canada’s capital of Ottawa and they will proceed throughout the city today.

Wain is passionate about the Million Deplorables March. He says he was inspired to lead this weekend’s event because he felt Trudeau was getting a free ride from the media and a pass from too many voters.

“Nothing was being done about this corrupt government…Trudeau stepped out-of-bounds with waving the pot leaf in front of the nose of the tokers and his nice friendly-looking smile won him the housewives. So now we’re in a situation where we have a complete moron at the helm and he’s spending more than we can afford. He’s destroying our country with carbon taxes, he’s destroying small business,” Wain told The Daily Caller Saturday.

Unlike most of the Canadian media, Wain is exultant over President Donald Trump’s decision to remove the United States from the Paris Climate Accord

“Donald Trump’s a smart man; he knows a con when he sees one.” Wain points out that the current environmental movement was initiated in part by Maurice Strong, whom the current prime minister’s father, Pierre Trudeau, appointed as an environmental advisor to the United Nations when the elder Trudeau was leading Canada.

Wain believes the Canadian media is only telling half of the story. “Most Canadians are asleep because fake news is telling them stories that just aren’t true.”

Rod Noble is marching today to protest a motion, M-103, that was recently passed in the Canadian House of Commons that could potentially criminalize criticism of Muslims.

“We already have extensive protection for all groups and this is really special treatment and it’s part of a cookie cutter policy that is happening all across the western world…it’s part of the deliberate Islamization of the West…coordinated by George Soros and we have to stop this,” he says.

He believes M-103 could lead to the implementation of Sharia law in Canada.

The Million Canadian March wraps up Sunday afternoon with a rally on Parliament Hill.

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Immigrants and Canadians share responsibility to integrate, advocate says

Is it the responsibility of immigrants to integrate into Canadian society? Or is it the responsibility of Canadian society to create a welcoming atmosphere?

Lower Mainland experts and immigrants say the answer is yes to both questions.

Ninu Kang, a director with MOSAIC, a non-profit that helps new immigrants and refugees settle in Canada, is one such person.

Are we welcoming them?

“I absolutely think it’s incumbent on immigrant communities to branch out. But the question we have to ask ourselves is why do they feel more comfortable living together?” she told On The Coast‘s Vivian Luk

“Are we, the other neighbourhoods welcoming them? Or are we shoving them back into their own silos because that’s where the comfort is, that’s where they’re not going to experience racism and neighbours using racial slurs on them?”

Growing up on Vancouver Island, Kang says she was the target of discrimination, both verbally and physically.

She says things are better for immigrants and their children in B.C. now. There is more diversity and inclusivity, Employers are being trained in cultural competency and there is a lot more support for newcomers.

Still, things are far from perfect.

Things are far from perfect

Gurdev Dosanjh was born in India, brought up in Ireland, married in England and came to Canada about 40 years ago with her husband and three children.

Her husband had worked in a foundry in England, and she was in business administration. But they had no luck landing similar work when they got to Vancouver.

Dosanjh says she would apply for jobs and she’d be told to come for an interview. But when she arrived, she’d be told the posting had been filled or the company wasn’t hiring anymore.

“So, we ended up doing cleaning jobs and my husband was digging ditches. Never had done anything like that in our lives,” she said.

“It wasn’t just a blow to our physical selves, it was [to our] emotional, psychological selves. We thought we were coming for a better life, but it was quite the opposite.”

The posting has been filled

Looking back, Dosanjh says she wonders whether racism played a factor. 

“The idea is out there that immigrants, when they come, they’re more of a burden to society —that they come empty handed,” she said.

“They also have a lot to give as well. They want to share what was life like in their country. They want to share richness, want to forge it together, weave it together.”

Irshad Manji, a Vancouver-raised author and educator who specializes in issues of race and multiculturalism, says Canada’s multicultural policies are in part responsible for why some immigrants don’t integrate with the broader Canadian society.

She says these policies emphasize preserving the status quo when it comes to traditions and don’t encourage diversity of thought.

Integrating means co-creating

“If Canada focuses on maintaining the status quo within cultures, the message to Canadians is that it’s OK to self-segregate,” she wrote in an email.

At the same time, she says integration needs to be more than immigrants being pressured to adopt” Canadian” values.

“Integration would mean that migrants see opportunities for co-creating their worlds with, not separate from, fellow Canadians,” she wrote.

Listen to the full interview:

Liberals focus on future election and Quebec pride is part of package

Quebec Health Minister Gaetan Barrette
Jacques Boissinot / THE CANADIAN PRESS

TROIS-RIVIÈRES — More women, more days off for workers, a no-frills no fuss way to get involved in the party, and constant reminders to Quebecers that they should be proud of their homeland, but happy to be Canadian too.

With 16 months before the next general election, Quebec’s Liberals have starting laying the building blocks of their re-election campaign.

And it revolves around that most simple of acronyms, KISS or keep it simple stupid.

“I have always said we won’t win the next election just talking about our past accomplishments,” Couillard told 400 Liberals at a speech closing a one day party general council meeting here.

“What people want to hear is what are you going to do for the next four years. And we need to learn to talk about concrete things. People don’t see hundreds of millions to renovate schools. They see the repaired school on the corner of the street.”

“We know what we need to talk about (when we meet people). We have to talk about their life, talk about their reality.”

And he had choice words for a columnist who accused him of having a secret agenda to transform Quebecers into Canadians. Couillard this week surprised the country by announcing the word constitution is no longer taboo and Quebec ‘wants in’ eventually.

“I have news for you,” he said. “Quebecers have always been Quebecers above all, but they have always been Canadian and proud of it and they will stay that way.”

The speech, which Couillard delivered standing in the middle of a round stage with no teleprompter and no notes, brought the crowd to their feet, giving the meeting a decidedly electoral feel.

He mentioned a long list of things he said his government accomplished, from super nurses to Montreal’s electric train to the development plan for northern Quebec which is finally taking flight.

And he said Ontario’s idea of giving workers more holidays times is very interesting, a hint that it could be part of the party’s election platform.

He had one shout-out to English-speaking Quebecers too.

“The English-speaking community is part of my Quebec, it’s part of my first class Quebec and your institutions are important to me.”

The long speech came at the end of a council focused on more down-to-earth issues all prepping the terrain for the election. High on the list is sagging membership and how to get people interested and active in politics. 

Couillard’s big announcement on that front was that he wants to increase the number of women candidates in the next election campaign, to what he called the “parity zone,” of about 40 per cent.

At an afternoon news conference, he ruled out using his power as leader to designate candidates, but he believes riding associations will get the message. In the last election campaign, 30 per cent of the Liberal candidates were women.

There was some sobering news too. Rumours of plunging party membership are true. Party president Gilbert Grimard broke the news at a closed-door morning workshop where he displayed a chart with big arrows showing the slide.

He called the trend “worrisome.”

Later, party whip Stéphane Billette bluntly told the crowd membership has dropped 40,000 in 10 years. Party officials later refused to reveal any detailed numbers.

But former party policy commission chairman Jérôme Turcotte, in making public a report on party activism in November 2016,  revealed the party was down to 37,000 members. He said the Liberals had lost more than 15,000 members since the fall of 2014, a 30 per cent loss.

Compare that to the glory days in the 1980’s where the Liberals boasted 130,000 members, the Parti Québécois 200,000. The likely current number is in the range of 30,000 members.

“There has been a drop,” Couillard said noting it is part of a world wide trend towards less political activism in traditional party structures.

The PQ today claims 90,000 members, the Coalition Avenir Québec 11,500. Only Québec solidaire is growing, up 6,000 members to a total of 16,000 in about a month thanks to the arrival of star candidate Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois.

The party spent Saturday afternoon debating ways to re-connect with voters and get people back into the fold, approving the creation of a new non-voting party “sympathizer,” category in which citizens can attend political events and receive information without being a full member.

Speaking at the workshop, Couillard said the party needs to tell voters joining a party has advantages because they can have impact.

One day, they can look back on a line in policy statement, see their idea come true and say to themselves, “I put a brick in Quebec’s democracy wall.”

But on their way into the meeting, the Liberals found themselves trying to deflect criticism at home and in the rest of Canada about their choice to re-launch the constitutional debate.

Off the top they said they didn’t appreciate Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s snap dismissal of the subject without even having read Quebec’s proposal.

“I found it unfortunate,” Health Minister Gaétan Barrette said. “Mr. Trudeau is (the) prime minister of Canada and as prime minister of Canada, we ask ourselves: does he consider the constitution an important document?

“He can’t just brush aside all conversation or all debate on the founding text of everything.”

Since Couillard presented his government’s new plan Thursday, a chorus of “No, thank you,” editorials have been published in Quebec and across the land. Not a single premier has expressed any interest in the subject.

Couillard responded by saying any constitutional wheeling-and-dealing is a long way off “and (is) just the finish line” for the plan.

“It’s true nobody in Quebec gets out of bed in the morning thinking about the constitution,” Barrette said. “But everyone, somewhere in their hearts, wants the Quebec identity and Canadian francophonie to have a formal place in the constitution.

“Is Quebec just an influence in Canada, or is Quebec an essential pillar of Canada? And right now, we are not. Yes, we feel exiled in Canada because we are not (officially) part of it.”

Related

Treasury Board President Pierre Moreau concurred and downplayed Trudeau’s dismissal by saying the PM was asked before he had had a chance to read the document.

There have been reports Trudeau had not been handed an advance copy of the document, which is almost 200 pages long.

Moreau repeated the government does not expect other parties in the federation to immediately sit down and talk turkey.

“But I think it’s completely normal that a party, which forms the government, indicates what it is, that the Liberal Party of Quebec is federalist and what are our thoughts on this question. It’s an important element. It’s as important as infrastructure,” Moreau said.

“What’s important is re-opening a dialogue,” said former policy committee chairman Turcotte. “There’s no deadlines here, no threats. Talking about the constitution is not a sin.”

But the day-to-day business of governing was not far off the radar for the Liberals. Outside the Trois-Rivières convention centre, a clutch of striking government engineers set up picket lines, blowing horns and whistles that could be heard inside.

pauthier@postmedia.com

@PhilipAuthier

“We feel exiled in Canada:” Health Minister Barrette

Quebec Health Minister Gaetan Barrette
Jacques Boissinot / THE CANADIAN PRESS

TROIS-RIVIÈRES — More women, more days off for workers, a no-frills no fuss way to get involved in the party, and constant reminders to Quebecers that they should be proud of their homeland, but happy to be Canadian too.

With 16 months before the next general election, Quebec’s Liberals have starting laying the building blocks of their re-election campaign.

And it revolves around that most simple of acronyms, KISS or keep it simple stupid.

“I have always said we won’t win the next election just talking about our past accomplishments,” Couillard told 400 Liberals at a speech closing a one day party general council meeting here.

“What people want to hear is what are you going to do for the next four years. And we need to learn to talk about concrete things. People don’t see hundreds of millions to renovate schools. They see the repaired school on the corner of the street.”

“We know what we need to talk about (when we meet people). We have to talk about their life, talk about their reality.”

And he had choice words for a columnist who accused him of having a secret agenda to transform Quebecers into Canadians. Couillard this week surprised the country by announcing the word constitution is no longer taboo and Quebec ‘wants in’ eventually.

“I have news for you,” he said. “Quebecers have always been Quebecers above all, but they have always been Canadian and proud of it and they will stay that way.”

The speech, which Couillard delivered standing in the middle of a round stage with no teleprompter and no notes, brought the crowd to their feet, giving the meeting a decidedly electoral feel.

He mentioned a long list of things he said his government accomplished, from super nurses to Montreal’s electric train to the development plan for northern Quebec which is finally taking flight.

And he said Ontario’s idea of giving workers more holidays times is very interesting, a hint that it could be part of the party’s election platform.

He had one shout-out to English-speaking Quebecers too.

“The English-speaking community is part of my Quebec, it’s part of my first class Quebec and your institutions are important to me.”

The long speech came at the end of a council focused on more down-to-earth issues all prepping the terrain for the election. High on the list is sagging membership and how to get people interested and active in politics. 

Couillard’s big announcement on that front was that he wants to increase the number of women candidates in the next election campaign, to what he called the “parity zone,” of about 40 per cent.

At an afternoon news conference, he ruled out using his power as leader to designate candidates, but he believes riding associations will get the message. In the last election campaign, 30 per cent of the Liberal candidates were women.

There was some sobering news too. Rumours of plunging party membership are true. Party president Gilbert Grimard broke the news at a closed-door morning workshop where he displayed a chart with big arrows showing the slide.

He called the trend “worrisome.”

Later, party whip Stéphane Billette bluntly told the crowd membership has dropped 40,000 in 10 years. Party officials later refused to reveal any detailed numbers.

But former party policy commission chairman Jérôme Turcotte, in making public a report on party activism in November 2016,  revealed the party was down to 37,000 members. He said the Liberals had lost more than 15,000 members since the fall of 2014, a 30 per cent loss.

Compare that to the glory days in the 1980’s where the Liberals boasted 130,000 members, the Parti Québécois 200,000. The likely current number is in the range of 30,000 members.

“There has been a drop,” Couillard said noting it is part of a world wide trend towards less political activism in traditional party structures.

The PQ today claims 90,000 members, the Coalition Avenir Québec 11,500. Only Québec solidaire is growing, up 6,000 members to a total of 16,000 in about a month thanks to the arrival of star candidate Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois.

The party spent Saturday afternoon debating ways to re-connect with voters and get people back into the fold, approving the creation of a new non-voting party “sympathizer,” category in which citizens can attend political events and receive information without being a full member.

Speaking at the workshop, Couillard said the party needs to tell voters joining a party has advantages because they can have impact.

One day, they can look back on a line in policy statement, see their idea come true and say to themselves, “I put a brick in Quebec’s democracy wall.”

But on their way into the meeting, the Liberals found themselves trying to deflect criticism at home and in the rest of Canada about their choice to re-launch the constitutional debate.

Off the top they said they didn’t appreciate Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s snap dismissal of the subject without even having read Quebec’s proposal.

“I found it unfortunate,” Health Minister Gaétan Barrette said. “Mr. Trudeau is (the) prime minister of Canada and as prime minister of Canada, we ask ourselves: does he consider the constitution an important document?

“He can’t just brush aside all conversation or all debate on the founding text of everything.”

Since Couillard presented his government’s new plan Thursday, a chorus of “No, thank you,” editorials have been published in Quebec and across the land. Not a single premier has expressed any interest in the subject.

Couillard responded by saying any constitutional wheeling-and-dealing is a long way off “and (is) just the finish line” for the plan.

“It’s true nobody in Quebec gets out of bed in the morning thinking about the constitution,” Barrette said. “But everyone, somewhere in their hearts, wants the Quebec identity and Canadian francophonie to have a formal place in the constitution.

“Is Quebec just an influence in Canada, or is Quebec an essential pillar of Canada? And right now, we are not. Yes, we feel exiled in Canada because we are not (officially) part of it.”

Related

Treasury Board President Pierre Moreau concurred and downplayed Trudeau’s dismissal by saying the PM was asked before he had had a chance to read the document.

There have been reports Trudeau had not been handed an advance copy of the document, which is almost 200 pages long.

Moreau repeated the government does not expect other parties in the federation to immediately sit down and talk turkey.

“But I think it’s completely normal that a party, which forms the government, indicates what it is, that the Liberal Party of Quebec is federalist and what are our thoughts on this question. It’s an important element. It’s as important as infrastructure,” Moreau said.

“What’s important is re-opening a dialogue,” said former policy committee chairman Turcotte. “There’s no deadlines here, no threats. Talking about the constitution is not a sin.”

But the day-to-day business of governing was not far off the radar for the Liberals. Outside the Trois-Rivières convention centre, a clutch of striking government engineers set up picket lines, blowing horns and whistles that could be heard inside.

pauthier@postmedia.com

@PhilipAuthier

After Trump, it’s time for Canada to rethink its destructive green agenda

If you judged President Donald Trump’s decision to back out of the Paris climate agreement by just the headlines and hysterical outrage from celebrities, you’d think it was so villainous he’d just committed to napalm bombing rainforests and strangling dolphins.

The American Civil Liberties Union gets top prize for most absurd response, tweeting out: “Pulling out of the Paris Agreement would be a massive step back for racial justice, and an assault on communities of color across the U.S.”

A close second is the magazine Scientific American, posting a picture of a barren wasteland as their prediction of what the country will now look like thanks to this decision.

It’s also been amusing to watch the haters try to square a couple of circles. 

While Trump says the agreement came with “draconian financial and economic burdens” his detractors point out it’s non-binding and countries make up their own NDCs (nationally determined contributions). But if it’s non-binding and countries make their own terms, why do these activists even think the agreement matters in the first place?

For starters, the Paris deal actually does come with significant financial repercussions on two fronts. 

The first is the cash that developed countries have to pony up into what’s called the Green Climate Fund, which the agreement reaffirmed.

The goal is to raise $100 billion annually from global taxpayers in developed nations and give it to developing nations to use for various green schemes. Naturally, “green” companies that stand to profit love this idea.

The U.S. had until Thursday committed $3 billion and Canada remains on the hook for $277 million. These are currently one-off payments but the idea is to make them annual and much larger.

“This agreement is less about the climate and more about other countries gaining a financial advantage over the United States,” Trump said Thursday in his Rose Garden speech.

The second financial implication is that whatever NDC a country cobbles together will without a doubt have some negative impact on industry and consumers.

Not only do they not want you to dwell on this point, governments are even willing to play games to hide these facts from you.

Back in February Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre tried to get the Liberal government to release a memo by a deputy finance minister outlining how a national carbon tax would hit Canadians in their wallets.

Despite Prime Minister Justin Trudeau campaigning on transparent government and denouncing a supposed “war on science”, the Liberals wanted this info kept secret, tightly controlled.

This is ultimately what this whole green scheme racket boils down to: Control versus freedom. Compulsion versus voluntarism.

Trump hinted at that in his speech. “The United States, under the Trump administration, will continue to be the cleanest and most environmentally friendly country on Earth,” the president said. “We will be environmentally friendly, but we’re not going to put our businesses out of work and we’re not going to lose our jobs.”

These are confusing sentences to understand for people who have been lulled over the years into believing that government action is the only mechanism we have for solving problems.

But the truth is that civil society – which has always been upstream from politics, influencing it and not influenced by it – will deal with whatever climate issues we face far more effectively and honestly than the slow cogs of government could ever hope to do.

Here’s a CBC article talking about Environment Minister Catherine McKenna’s take on Trump’s position that echoes this point: “Meanwhile, clean energy technology is getting more affordable. And the market, McKenna argues regularly, is deciding to move in that direction.”

And here’s a line from an otherwise extremely anti-Trump piece at the news site Vox: “The fact is, the low price of natural gas, stagnant power demand, the rapidly falling cost of renewable energy, and the explosive growth in electric vehicles mean that the US is likely to continue reducing emissions no matter what Trump does.”

You can find quotes like this everywhere, usually from authors who think they’re being anti-Trump. Yet all these facts do is prove why we don’t need massive, complex global schemes that negatively impact regular families. We’re heading there anyway. Just let innovative businesses, passionate citizens and informed consumers do their thing.

Now that Trump is backing away from this dubious shell game, it’s going to make the U.S. market look even more attractive to manufacturers in Canada.

It’s also a clear sign that he won’t force more harm onto regular families, like Ontario and Alberta have done.

While Canadians shouldn’t hold their breath, this is the perfect occasion for our own politicians to rethink the destructive green agenda we’re on in this country.

 My national security book “Pulse Attack: The Real Story Behind The Secret Weapon That Can Destroy North America” is coming out in the next few days. Join my mailing list at www.furey.ca to get a discount code for the book.

As Canada’s Pemberton event folds, is era of indie festivals reaching an end?


Music executive warns of danger to ‘festival ecosystem’ after British Columbia event collapses without refunds for ticket-holders

One of the two stages at last year’s Pemberton music festival.




One of the two stages at last year’s Pemberton music festival.
Photograph: Tim Mosenfelder/FilmMagic

As Canada’s Pemberton event folds, is era of indie festivals reaching an end?


Music executive warns of danger to ‘festival ecosystem’ after British Columbia event collapses without refunds for ticket-holders

Concert promoters are warning that the era of independent music festivals could be drawing to a close, following the abrupt collapse of two events.

The Pemberton festival was due to take place in British Columbia in mid-July, with performances by Chance the Rapper, Haim, Muse and A Tribe Called Quest. But late last month the festival was abruptly cancelled, placed in bankruptcy, and ticket holders informed they would not be refunded.

It comes after the disintegration of Fyre, a supermodel-fronted festival in the Bahamas that left hundreds of festival-goers stranded without food, water or shelter last April. With Bestival also suspending its Toronto event after two years, there are concerns about the future of festivals in North America.

“This could be the symbolic end for independently promoted festivals,” Mark Geiger, head of music at the William Morris talent agency, told the New York Times. Geiger, whose agency represents many of the acts at Pemberton, described the event as a “fraud, pure and simple” and said he plans to go after the organisers.

“I want each of them to know, I’m coming after you personally,” he told Billboard. “You can’t do this much damage to the festival ecosystem and think you can get away with it.”

Others believe that the collapse of the two festivals underlines the difficulties of inexperienced people trying to set up a successful event in a crowded marketplace.

“Fyre and Pemberton are two outlier events,” says music manager Andy Gershon. “Fyre was a disaster from conception, and Pemberton did not involve longstandingmusic promoters but business people who clearly did not understand the nuances of music festivals, of which there are many.”

There is mounting anger that although Pemberton’s shell company has been placed in bankruptcy, the organisers and creditors could walk away financially unscathed. According to bankruptcy filings, the festival lost money for three years, and sold 18,000 tickets in 2017, down from 38,000 last year. Event planners say it typically takes several years for a festival to become profitable – a threshold many cannot reach given the proliferation of rival events and the repetition of headliner acts.

“The issue for festivals is location and headlining talent,” says Gershon. Noting how Chance the Rapper is the leading attraction at numerous events this season, Gershon said there is too much repetition and too few headliners available, with the exception of country music.

Missy Elliott performs at the Pemberton festival in 2015.


Missy Elliott performs at the Pemberton festival in 2015. Photograph: Andrew Chin/Getty Images

“People saw the money that festivals can generate, and that attracted investors [after] short-term profits. The truth is, a successful festival takes several years to develop. It’s risky and most generate losses for those first few years.”

Several Fyre-related lawsuits are also working their way through the courts. Last week, a judge in New York ordered Fyre organisers Billy McFarland and Ja Rule to turn over the festival’s bank records. Lawyers for one of Fyre’s creditors, Oleg Itkin, claimed organisers had created a Ponzi scheme doomed to leave investors disappointed. “McFarland will potentially be seen as the Madoff of the millennials,” Michael Quinn, Itkin’s lawyer, told the Guardian, referring to convicted fraudster Bernie Madoff.

Whereas Fyre had used supermodels like Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid to promote a Caribbean idyll of music, sand, sex and glamour, Pemberton offered fun in the forests 100 miles north of Vancouver.

“The only difference between Pemberton and Fyre is that Pemberton sold their event with trees instead of supermodels,” Geiger said.

Pemberton organiser Evan Harrison said he lobbied the festival’s majority owners to limit placing the burden on fans. He did not reveal if the bands booked to play had returned their advances.

The collapses of Fyre and Pemberton suggest the festival business may have passed its peak. The reigning behemoths of the business, Coachella and Glastonbury, have come under criticism for becoming too corporate, while a number of successful festivals are scaling back.

The UK’s Bestival shelved plans for a third Canadian festival this year after failing to sell enough tickets for 2016 when the Cure headlined. This year’s Secret Garden Party, which claims to have invented glamping, will also be the last of its kind.

Founder Freddie Fellowes told the NME that the Cambridgeshire festival, a staple on the summer music calendar for 15 years, will end at its peak. “There is never the perfect time to drop this bombshell, too early or too late and people are going to miss out and be disappointed. Hopefully we have struck the middle ground here.”

But with festival season in full swing, the market tests are coming up fast. Broken Social Scene’s Kevin Drew, organiser of this weekend’s Field Trip outside Toronto, told Billboard he didn’t know why some people attend some events and not others. “We live in a time of people consuming way too much information, and what live music is supposed to make you do is feel free,” he said.

Celebrating curls at Montreal’s Natural Hair Congress

Volunteers Shanon Mathé and Séphora Bure get help from Sophia Murphy at her Roots to Curls booth during Montreal’s Natural Hair Congress.
T’CHA DUNLEVY

“I really like taking care of my hair,” said Kassandra Tardif, 20, sitting down for a panel on entrepreneurship at Montreal’s second Natural Hair Congress, Saturday afternoon.

She was in the right place. The event is a celebration of black hair in its natural state, inviting guests to interact with vendors of natural hair products, cosmetics, food, fashion, jewelry and clothing, while offering conferences, panels and other events throughout the weekend.

“I’m in a natural mode,” Tardif continued, “so I know most of the products. I really know InHAIRitance.”

InHAIRitance is a salon owned Abisara Machold, who organized the first Natural Hair Congress as a single-day event in 2015. This year, she expanded it to two days while extending the scope beyond hair to encompass various issues facing the black community.

“It’s about so much more than just hair,” said Machold, who is originally from Austria and has been based in Montreal since 2010. “It’s about how you deal with the challenges of the professional world. How do people see you? (Being taken seriously is) one of my constant challenges as a black woman, young-looking — they see all that crazy hair, and think: ‘She’s bubbly and fun, with her little African hair shop.’ But I have a master’s in communication and political science.”

The goal of the Natural Hair Congress is to create a safe space where people of colour can come together and share ideas, she explained. And hair is a perfect starting point.

“Honestly, for a lot of women who just turned natural, it’s absolutely shocking to be around so many people who have curly hair,” Machold said. “We had a panel on curl diversity earlier today and we had women from Tunisia, Morocco, Iran, Jewish Montreal, Haiti and Nigeria.”

Sisters-in-law Sophia and Janet Murphy were happily answering questions at the booth for their Toronto company Roots to Curls.

“These products are specially made for the needs of natural hair,” Sophia said, noting that they do most of their business online.

“These products were never (in Canada) before; you had to go to the United States. So we started looking for products with natural ingredients and bringing them to the Canadian market.”

Black women are becoming increasingly interested in natural hair, they noted, and they enjoy being part of the change.

“When you transition from relaxed (or straightened) hair to natural hair, you’re embracing this whole new world,” Sophia said. “You’re getting to know your hair.”

“It’s become a movement now,” Janet added, “and it’s getting bigger.”

AT A GLANCE: The Natural Hair Congress continues on Sunday at the Loft Hotel, 314 Sherbrooke St. E. For more information, visit naturalhaircongress.com

tdunlevy@postmedia.com

twitter.com/TChaDunlevy

Business leaders express concern about promises in BC NDP Green agreement

On Tuesday, after releasing the details of a power-sharing agreement between the B.C. NDP and Green parties that is meant to topple the Liberal minority government, Horgan said ride hailing is coming to B.C., but he will make sure there is a level playing field for taxi companies and ride-hailing businesses.

Since the Liberals and the NDP-Greens are only separated by one seat, which party the Speaker comes from could determine who forms government.

“As the party that won the most seats in this election, the BC Liberals have a responsibility to face the Legislature as government – so BC’s future can be determined in the people’s house, not behind closed doors”.

The signing of the agreement did not stop Christy Clark from announcing Tuesday she plans to stay on as premier, and Barnett explains she will await the result in legislature before commenting further to the media.

NDP leader John Horgan and Green leader Andrew Weaver made the accord between their two parties official this afternoon.

“Weaver and Horgan announced they have reached a four-year Confidence and Supply Agreement that provides a path to forming a new government”.

The Greens were wooed by both sides for two heady weeks before pitching their lot with the NDP, which agreed to take up issues they have in common in return for the support.

The NDP-Green agreement proposed a slate of policies created to make life more affordable for British Columbians and to tackle poverty.

“B.C. Greens will support a new B.C. New Democrat government that works for people”.

Under the informal conventions of Canadian parliamentary democracy, Clark remains premier until she has lost the confidence of the legislature. The bottom line is, as the representative for Fraser-Nicola, I’ll go to Victoria, we’ll do the work, and we’ll work with whatever is in place.

The Greens and NDP agree on issues including electoral reform and banning corporate and union donations from politics but others will require compromise.

“We can probably guarantee that [the Speech from the Throne] – and [Clark] even said that – that it’s not going to be passed in the house”, said Conroy.

But Letnick said it appears clear what he called a “coalition” between the NDP and the B.C. Greens will defeat the Liberal minority government at the first opportunity. Notley’s New Democrats gained intervener status in the matter earlier this month, allowing it to advocate on behalf of the province against any lawsuits filed against the project, an ability Notley said would be exercised if British Columbia is in a fighting mood.

One that we think will conclude shortly, given today’s announcement, with Christy Clark and her party ousted from power in favour of an NDP/Green Party combination.

She spoke at the same time the B.C. legislative press gallery was in a lock-up to look at the deal inked between the NDP and Greens.

The Site C dam construction project will be referred to the B.C. Utilities Commission for review.

The pipeline project has already earned approval from the National Energy Board, the federal government, and the province of B.C. Trudeau said the $7.4-billion project will benefit all of Canada and noted, “Regardless of a change in government in B.C. or anywhere, the facts and evidence do not change”.

Shooting in Ottawa’s ByWard Market leaves 2 dead, 1 injured

A suspect exchanged gunfire with an Ottawa police officer early Saturday morning in a case that ended with two dead and one injured. 

The Ontario Special Investigations Unit said it is investigating the police-involved shooting in Ottawa’s ByWard Market in which “several shots” were fired. 

Jason Gennaro, a spokesperson for the police oversight agency, told reporters an Ottawa police officer driving in the market area responded to the intersection of Dalhousie and Clarence streets shortly after 2 a.m. Saturday where a man had been injured in a shooting.

That victim is now in hospital with non life-threatening injuries.

The responding officer attempted to arrest the suspect, but the man fled, Gennaro said. Moments later, another man, a 43-year-old, was shot. He was rushed to hospital where he was pronounced dead. 

The same officer chased the sole suspect into a parking garage on Murray Street, east of Dalhousie Street, where the two exchanged several rounds of gunfire. The suspect was pronounced dead at the scene. 

The police officer involved in the shooting was not injured, Gennaro said. 

The shooting took place in a popular market and tourism district, just a few blocks from Parliament Hill. People who work at businesses along Dalhousie were being told that the street would likely remain closed all day. 

The SIU investigation is in its preliminary stages and is focused on the shooting in the garage that ended in the suspect’s death, according to Gennaro. 

Police have not identified any of the victims or the suspect. 

SIU respond to ByWard Market shooting June 3, 2017

An Ottawa police officer, left, and two Special Investigations Unit officers examine a crime scene in the ByWard Market on Saturday, June 3, 2017 where two people were killed and another man injured. (Matthew Kupfer/CBC)

‘I saw blood on the floor’

Tareq Savari told CBC News he witnessed the aftermath of the shootings and the first responders rushing to the scene. 

“I heard some gunshot and I was telling my friends, ‘It’s a gunshot.’ He told me ‘No, it’s a firework.’ Literally 30 seconds or 40 seconds later I see the cops parking their cars and running from Clarence to Dalhousie,” Savari said.

He said he saw several people surround one of the shooting victims, but he wasn’t sure who it was. 

“I saw blood on the floor, on the sidewalk, but when they put him in the corner they were holding his blood. There was a lot of people around him.”

10 officers assigned to investigate shooting

The SIU is called in whenever there is an incident involving police that results in a death, serious injury, or an allegation of sexual assault. The oversight body is responsible for determining if the officer involved committed a criminal offence. 

Ten officers with the SIU will take over the investigation into the deadly shootings: three investigators and seven forensic investigators. One Ottawa police officer is the subject of the investigation and the SIU also identified two witness officers from city police. 

The police watchdog is asking anyone with video footage of the shootings to upload it to the SIU website to assist investigators. 

byward market shooting ottawa 2 dead

Ottawa police investigate in the ByWard Market after two people were killed in a shooting overnight. (CBC)

Police tape was strung up along Dalhousie Street, which remained closed Saturday between Murray and Clarence streets.

‘Tragic’ shooting

Mathieu Fleury, the city councillor for the area, said Saturday afternoon his thoughts are with those who are affected by the overnight shootings.

In a written statement to CBC News, Fleury said the incident “is reflective of the drug and gang activity across our city.”

Neither the SIU or Ottawa police have said Saturday’s shooting is drug- or gang-related.

“An incident of this nature is tragic and my thoughts are with those who have been impacted by this late night events. While there is no immediate threat to the public, I understand the Special Investigation Unit continues to investigate the scene,” the councillor said.

“We await more detailed information to come to light. The ByWard Market is the historical area in our city, it is a gem.”

Ottawa police have not commented on the shooting.

Why Was Grammy Winner Brandy Rushed To The Hospital? International Business Times

Grammy Award-winning singer Brandy was recently rushed to a hospital after falling unconscious while on board a Delta flight.

TMZ, Brandy was traveling to New York from Los Angeles, and the incident occurred before her flight took off. Since the plane was still on the ground, paramedics were able to rush in and administer help.” data-reactid=”12″>According to TMZ, Brandy was traveling to New York from Los Angeles, and the incident occurred before her flight took off. Since the plane was still on the ground, paramedics were able to rush in and administer help.

Read: Delta Airlines held puppy hostage for 33 hours” data-reactid=”13″>Read: Delta Airlines held puppy hostage for 33 hours

New York Post, saying, “The flight crew of Delta flight 763 from LAX to New York’s JFK International Airport returned to the gate, prior to the departure, after a customer fell ill on board. Medical personnel met the flight and transported the customer to a local hospital. Flight 763 departed for New York roughly 45 minutes behind schedule.”” data-reactid=”14″>A spokesman for Delta Airlines released a statement to the New York Post, saying, “The flight crew of Delta flight 763 from LAX to New York’s JFK International Airport returned to the gate, prior to the departure, after a customer fell ill on board. Medical personnel met the flight and transported the customer to a local hospital. Flight 763 departed for New York roughly 45 minutes behind schedule.”

statement saying that her client’s rigorous schedule took a toll on the singer. Barnes also updated Brandy’s fans about her condition and said that she has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home. The rep revealed that Brandy was at the studio until very late the night before she took the 5:45 a.m. flight. Barnes added that Brandy will be relaxing and recovering for the next few days.” data-reactid=”15″>Brandy’s publicist, Courtney Barnes, released a statement saying that her client’s rigorous schedule took a toll on the singer. Barnes also updated Brandy’s fans about her condition and said that she has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home. The rep revealed that Brandy was at the studio until very late the night before she took the 5:45 a.m. flight. Barnes added that Brandy will be relaxing and recovering for the next few days.

Union Pool stage on Saturday, June 3, will be postponed. On June 10 and 11, she is supposed to be heading to the West Hollywood Park in California. On July 2, Brandy is expected to perform at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion in Texas. On July 30, the singer will be performing at the TD Echo Beach in Canada.” data-reactid=”16″>At present, Brandy is on her third headlining tour. By the looks of it, some of her shows, including the one at the Union Pool stage on Saturday, June 3, will be postponed. On June 10 and 11, she is supposed to be heading to the West Hollywood Park in California. On July 2, Brandy is expected to perform at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion in Texas. On July 30, the singer will be performing at the TD Echo Beach in Canada.

Some of Brandy’s hit songs include “The Boy Is Mine,” “Missing You,” “Another Day In Paradise,” “What About Us” and more. Throughout the years, Brandy has also received a slew of prestigious awards. In 2016, Brandy received the Soul Train Music Lady of Soul Award. In 2014, she was given the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series. In 1995, she accepted the Billboard Music Award for New R&B/Hip-Hop Artist of the Year.

Brandy

Brandy will go on a short break from her ongoing tour after falling unconscious due to overfatigue. Pictured: Brandy at the Viacom BET “Zoe Ever After” panel in Pasadena, California on Jan. 6, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Alex Gallardo ” data-reactid=”29″> Brandy will go on a short break from her ongoing tour after falling unconscious due to overfatigue. Pictured: Brandy at the Viacom BET “Zoe Ever After” panel in Pasadena, California on Jan. 6, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Alex Gallardo

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