Canada to implement northern B.C. oil tanker ban this year: CBC

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada’s Liberal government will this year deliver on its pledge for a moratorium on oil tanker traffic along the northern coast of British Columbia, CBC News reported on Friday.

Transport Minister Marc Garneau confirmed the plan in an interview with CBC Radio’s “The House,” the broadcaster said on its website.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last year instructed Garneau to formalize the ban on oil tanker traffic, effectively slamming the door on a pipeline project that was already facing massive development hurdles.

The ban is one of several obstacles to the building of Enbridge Inc’s Northern Gateway pipeline, which would carry oil sands crude from near Edmonton, Alberta, to a deepwater port at Kitimat, British Columbia, for export to Asian markets.

Separately, Garneau said the government was looking at a recommendation that it privatize airports, but that “it’s not a front-burner exercise” and people should not jump …
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Canada to implement northern British Columbia oil tanker ban this year: CBC

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada’s Liberal government will this year deliver on its pledge for a moratorium on oil tanker traffic along the northern coast of British Columbia, CBC News reported on Friday.

Transport Minister Marc Garneau confirmed the plan in an interview with CBC Radio’s “The House,” the broadcaster said on its website.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last year instructed Garneau to formalize the ban on oil tanker traffic, effectively slamming the door on a pipeline project that was already facing massive development hurdles.

The ban is one of several obstacles to the building of Enbridge Inc’s Northern Gateway pipeline, which would carry oil sands crude from near Edmonton, Alberta, to a deepwater port at Kitimat, British Columbia, for export to Asian markets.

Separately, Garneau said the government was looking at a recommendation that it privatize airports, but that “it’s not a front-burner exercise” and people should not jump …
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Woodfibre to begin building Canada LNG project in 2017

(Adds background on Squamish environmental consultations)By Nia Williams Nov 4 Woodfibre LNG will start
building British Columbia’s first liquefied natural gas
processing and export terminal in 2017, it said on Friday, a
project that would grant Canada a long-awaited opportunity to
enter the global market.The facility near Squamish, north of Vancouver, will export
2.1 million tonnes a year once it is operational in 2020,
according to a company statement.However, Woodfibre is relatively small compared to other
proposed LNG projects in the province and will have little
impact on weak Canadian natural gas prices, said Samir Kayande,
a director at research group RS Energy.More than a dozen LNG projects have been proposed for
British Columbia, but the global slump in energy prices has
undermined their feasibility and delayed investment.

In September, Canada approved a proposed C$36 billion,
12-million-tonne-a-year LNG project by Petroliam Nasional
Berhad. But Petronas, as the Malaysian state-owned oil …
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Five U.S. election races Canadian businesses should watch (that aren’t for president)

Senator Charles Schumer of New York. (Alex Wong/Getty)This post has been updated.
It’s hard to look away from the trainwreck that is the 2016 American presidential race. But on the periphery of the contentious campaign are dozens of other political races—for senators, house representatives, and governors—that also hold weighty implications for the future of the U.S., and by extension, the nations that do business with it.
“It’s not so much the presidential race that matters to U.S.-Canada relations, it’s congressional races,” says Renan Levine, a political science professor at the University of Toronto. “The issues that tend to impact Canadians, like changes in how border crossing is managed, lumber disputes, and the Keystone XL Pipeline, those aren’t [typically] presidential decisions; those are congressional decisions that go beyond the White House.”

While there are certainly several tight congressional races as we …

The great Canadian mining non-disaster

A couple of dozen men in hard hats and orange coveralls are gathered in a brightly lit, mud-splattered room, chatting about the type of topics we all chat about at work – the Leafs’ prospects, a daughter’s coming wedding, a deer someone saw on the drive in.
What makes these men different from pampered folks like you and me is that they are getting ready to drop more than half a mile into the earth. Once underground at Vale SA’s Totten Mine in Sudbury, Ont., they will operate giant scoops and haulers in dim, sweltering tunnels that have the capacity to kill the unwary or the unlucky.
“We’re lucky here because the depth and the ground conditions are pretty favourable for less seismic activity,” mine manager Gilbert Lamarche says nonchalantly as we prepare for the “cage,” or elevator, that will take us down to working depth. “But in …

Why business class isn't worth the expense

The Independent and other media recently have been full of stories about how the slump in sterling is damaging the wallets and purses of holidaymakers: a family of four taking the Sydney Harbour Bridge Climb will now pay as much as for a cheap flight from London to Australia’s biggest city.

But arguably the people who deserve the most sympathy (oh, go on, just for once) are company bean-counters. The men and women who are responsible for cost control are finding that business travel costs are increasing faster than the price of Marmite.

Of course they may be working for firms that are set to do very well from the slump in sterling, by selling more goods and services thanks to the depreciation in the pound. But they are still faced with the fact that, in sterling terms, pretty much every expense a business traveller incurs when abroad is …

Closed for business

Donald Trump says he would bring back outsourced manufacturing jobs from Mexico and China. There’s a factory that is a symbol of outsourcing.”You thought you had a job for life,” says Gregg Trusty. “As long as you didn’t show up to work drunk or punch your supervisor, you thought you could work there until you retired.”A wander around the factory Trusty is talking about gives a stark example of the precarious nature of the American economy today. The gigantic Western Electric plant in Shreveport, Louisiana was once one of the country’s biggest producers of telephones. Now it’s abandoned, the machinery silently rusting. Nature creeps in on all sides. Dusty papers sit on desks and lights still blaze on to empty factory floors, as if the people working there were forced to leave in a hurry.

If you want to understand how Donald Trump has tapped into economic insecurity …

Bombardier flagship business jet completes its first test flight

By Allison Lampert

MONTREAL (Reuters) – Bombardier Inc’s BBDb.TO Global 7000 completed its first test flight over Toronto on Friday, the company said, a milestone for the long-range business jet considered critical to the growth of its corporate plane division.

The test aircraft took off from a Bombardier facility in Canada’s largest city on Friday morning and flew for about 2 hours and 27 minutes, the company said in a statement.

“The systems and aircraft performed as expected,” it said.

Because of previous delays, some investors and analysts had been skeptical that the first flight would take place in 2016, suggesting instead that it would fly in 2017. Bombardier had said the Global 7000 would fly in 2016.

Reuters reported last month that the Global 7000 was scheduled to make its first flight in November.

The new jet is scheduled to enter service during the second half of 2018 after being delayed for two years. Competitors in the …

Canada's energy business puts indigenous women, girls at risk, report says

By Ellen Wulfhorst

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Indigenous women and girls in northern Canada live in danger due to rampant development that has brought crime, ratcheted up the cost of living and destroyed traditional ways of life, Amnesty International said on Thursday.

The governments of Canada and British Columbia province fail to protect the thousands of indigenous people living in areas with intensive oil and gas extraction, coal mining and hydropower development, the human rights group said in a report.

“Unbridled resource development in this region is creating an environment where indigenous women and girls are confronted with levels of extreme violence that are shocking and pervasive,” Erika Guevara Rosas, Americas regional director for Amnesty International, said in a statement.

“The fact that these deeply troubling realities are not being addressed and prioritized when policy makers take decisions on resource development is a grave and troubling failure on …