Canada to spend $1.1 billion to boost oil spill response

By Catherine Ngai

VANCOUVER (Reuters) – Canada’s Liberal government on Monday vowed to toughen its response to oil spills at sea, a move that some critics say will increase local tanker traffic and hurt the environment.

As part of a marine safety plan to protect oceans, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Ottawa would spend C$1.5 billion ($1.1 billion) over five years on better response measures and research into how to clean up oil spills.

Trudeau said the plan “will make Canada a world leader in marine safety.”

However, environmentalists said the announcement was a sign Ottawa will approve the hotly contested …
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Air Canada profit beats estimates as passengers increase

By Allison Lampert

MONTREAL (Reuters) – Air Canada AC.TO reported a higher-than-expected quarterly profit on Monday as it flew more passengers, and the airline forecast lower costs for this quarter, sending its stock up nearly 7 percent.

Canada’s largest airline said it expected cost per available seat mile, excluding fuel expenses and unusual items, to decline 5 percent to 6 percent in the fourth quarter and by 2.75 percent to 3.75 percent this year.

Chief Financial Officer Michael Rousseau said he expected free cash flow to be more positive next year than this year but would provide more specifics in early 2017.

Rousseau also told …
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Canada oil spill program hit by cheap crude, lacks applicants

By Ethan Lou

The two-year oil price crash has hurt a Canadian government program that funds research on oil spill cleanups, resulting in fewer applicants than expected, a senior federal official said.As a result, the government will expand the scope of its Oil Spill Response Science Program and open a second call for applications this month, Marc Wickham, Natural Resources Canada’s director of energy science and technology programs, said in an interview late last week.The program funds research that improves cleanup methods for marine oil spills. Those eligible include production, pipeline and shipping companies in the energy sector.Wickham spoke with Reuters after it obtained details of the program’s amendment through an access-to-information request.Potential spills have been a concern for opponents of proposed Canadian pipelines that transport crude to coastal facilities.Pipelines grant Canada’s largely landlocked energy sector better access to international markets. But more exports would …
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Minister Han Changfu meets Canadian counterpart

Minister Han Changfu meets Canadian counterpart

DATE:2016-11-07 SOURCE:MOA Information Office

 

Minister Han Changfu met with Mr. Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food of Canada, in Beijing on Nov. 3, 2016. The two sides exchanged views on furthering agricultural cooperation between China and Canada.

At the meeting, Minister Han noted that, with the support of leaders of both countries, significant progress has been made in China-Canada agricultural cooperation. The two sides have not only signed the Action Plan for agricultural cooperation but also properly handled the problems on beef and rapeseed trade.

Minister Han made the following suggestions for further cooperation.

1. Giving full play to the mechanism of China-Canada Joint Committee on Agriculture to promote cooperation in food security, food safety and agro-processing as outlined in the Action Plan in a pragmatic manner.

2. Strengthening cooperation in green agriculture to promote sustainable agricultural development. China is willing to establish demonstration …
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B.C. Liberals in for a fight to win May election, Christy Clark tells convention

Christy Clark has told her party’s faithful that they are in a tough fight to win May’s provincial election.On Sunday, the B.C. Premier told more than 1,300 Liberals attending the last party convention before the election on May 9 that “we are going to have to fight to succeed in 2017 like we have never fought before and we are going to have to make sure we earn every single vote that’s out there.

“We’re going to have to work our hearts out,” she said in her keynote speech.Ms. Clark said she was skeptical about pundits, who say the Liberals are positioned to win again. “I didn’t believe the pundits in the last election. I don’t believe the pundits in this election either.”Read more: B.C. Liberal Party members call on provincial government to allow ride-sharingRead more: Haisla LNG backer Ellis Ross to …
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A U.S. election campaign like no other: Pundits

Donald Trump didn’t just ignore the political playbook.
He burned it.
The Toronto Sun asked two of the most seasoned and well-known campaigners in Canada — Conservative John Capobianco and Liberal Warren Kinsella — about the U.S. election battle:
•Is this U.S. election as anomaly or a game changer for how elections are run?
Kinsella
“This is an election without precedent. Trump will lose, but he has changed politics. Everyone — me included — said he couldn’t win the GOP nomination, and he did. Everyone said (anyone accused of being) a racist, sexist dirty old man couldn’t be a viable national candidate — but he was. Trump has turned the political conventional wisdom upside down, and you can probably expect to see other candidates aping him in the future. That’s not good, but it’s a fact.”
Capobianco
“This U.S. election is like none I have seen before …
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'People are afraid': American expats in Edmonton brace for U.S. presidential election results

American expats in Edmonton are gearing up to watch the most polarizing U.S. presidential election in recent history unfold on Tuesday. “There has never been a campaign like this — as dirty, as chaotic, as angry,” said Greg Anderson, a political science professor at University of Alberta. “It’s hard to take your eyes off it.”Anderson, who is originally from Salt Lake City, Utah, has been an Alberta resident for more than a decade. He said many U.S. voters believe both the Democrats and Republicans have put up “some pretty crappy candidates.”His vote was for the “lesser of two evils,” he said. This meant supporting Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump, who he described as a hotheaded narcissist.”This (election) has been particularly personal. It wasn’t easy, I’m no fan of Hillary,” he said. “My head tells me that Clinton is probably going to win Tuesday, but …
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The non-Americans' guide to US elections (Handy for citizens too)

By Doug Criss CNN (CNN) — The US presidential election. It’s exhilarating, it’s exhausting, but it’s also inexplicably complicated, even for us natives. Here’s everything you need to know to become an insta-pundit.When’s the election? Tuesday, November 8 for most Americans. Notice we say “most.” Millions will have already voted by then. That’s because early voting is a thing in the US. More than 40% of all votes this year will be cast before Election Day – a record. In some states, you can even vote early, change your mind and vote again. Yeah, we make democracy really easy.Why is the turnout so pathetic? Alright, you got us with that one. Our country loves the hype surrounding the elections, but the actual election? Not so much. Just 53.6% of the voting-age population cast a ballot in 2012. Some can’t. (Like felons. That’s 6 million right there.) Some just don’t feel like it. (We’re …
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Canada’s focus on trade is big for small business

Andrea Stairs is managing director of eBay Canada.U.S. presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump may vehemently disagree on most key issues – immigration, economic prescriptions and who has the right temperament to be president – but one item the opponents seem to align on is trade. Throughout the campaign, both have made increasingly definitive statements against the Trans-Pacific Partnership and demonstrated strong skepticism toward the North American free-trade agreement and other international deals. Time will tell who will win the election, but one thing is certain: Come Wednesday morning, Canada’s top trade partner may want a new deal.

Similarly, it took dramatic, last-ditch efforts to save the Canada-Europe Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement from being derailed by the Wallonian Parliament in Belgium. There remains a long, bumpy road to full ratification against a backdrop of intense opposition from European anti-trade activists. CETA may be signed, but many question …
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