Canada Goose prices IPO at C$17 per share

The issue will raise C$340 million.

The maker of luxury winter down jackets had earlier expected to price the offering of 20 million shares at C$14-C$16 per share.

The Toronto-based company will list its subordinate voting shares on the New York Stock Exchange and the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbol “GOOS”.

Canada Goose, which started in a small warehouse in 1957, sold a majority stake in 2013 to Bain Capital LLC, for an undisclosed amount, to help meet its growth ambitions.

The down used in Canada Goose coats, which sell for as much as $700 apiece, is a byproduct of the food industry, with most of it sourced from Hutterite farmers who raise free-range flocks in the Canadian prairies.

Down jackets are insulated with soft and warm underfeathers from duck or geese.

CIBC Capital Markets, Credit Suisse, Goldman Sachs & Co and RBC Capital Markets are lead underwriters to the offering.

(Reporting by Nikhil Subba in Bengaluru, Additional reporting by Parikshit Mishra; Editing by Vyas Mohan)


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Canadian Girl Guides cancel US travel ahead of ban

Girl Guides of Canada has cancelled all trips to the United States until further notice because it fears problems at the border.

The announcement comes days before President Donald Trump’s new US travel ban comes into effect on Thursday.

In a statement, the group said the “ability of all our members to equally enter this country is currently uncertain”.

The suspension includes short trips and all travel through US airports.

The group has also scrapped a planned summer camping trip to California in favour of an alternate destination.

Sarah Kiriliuk, national manager of marketing and communications for the Girl Guides of Canada, said the decision was “absolutely not” political but instead an operational decision made over a “general uncertainty” around Canada-US border travel.

“Girl Guides is a microcosm of Canada,” she said.

“We’re diverse, we’re multicultural. I don’t want to speak to any one girl or situation, our main priority was making sure our girls who had been planning trips for up to a year sometimes weren’t going to be turned away at the border because of one or more situations that were beyond their control.”

Under the new US travel ban, all nationals from Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen will not be permitted to enter the US or be issued an immigrant or non-immigrant visa for a 90-day period.

Ms Kiriliuk could not say how many members might have been barred from US entry under the new temporary ban, if any.

“At Girl Guides of Canada, we know our members value the safe, inclusive and accepting space that Guiding provides,” the statement said.

It went on: “These values are reflected in all we do, including the Girl Guide travel experiences we offer girls and women. This was a very difficult decision to make. We hope that members will appreciate this reflects our commitment to inclusivity and equal opportunities for all girls and women.”

The Girl Guides of Canada has chapters in provinces across the country and some 70,000 members and 20,000 adult female volunteers.

Any US visits already booked and paid for by regional Girl Guide chapters prior to the announcement would be reviewed on a “case-by-case” basis, Ms Kiriliuk said.

Some Canadian schools have also cancelled trips to the US in the wake of the travel ban, including the Greater Essex County District School Board in south-western Ontario.

According to figures provided by US Customs and Border Protection, the number of people being denied entry at the Canada-US boundary is roughly in line with previous years.

But confusion during the first few days of the previous US travel ban, which was eventually blocked by a federal court, and a series of recent incidents of Canadians going public with their experience being turned away at the border has led to questions over whether people are facing tougher measures when entering the US.

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Snowstorm forces Canada's biggest airport to cancel 100 flights

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada’s biggest airport canceled more than a hundred flights on Tuesday as a late winter storm brought more snow to southern Ontario, forcing several colleges to suspend classes.



About 26 percent of all departures and arrivals at Pearson International Airport, which serves the Toronto area, were canceled, with affected flights “mostly those scheduled for or from areas affected by the current weather system,” an airport spokeswoman said in an email.



More disruptions in Ontario were expected with Environment Canada forecasting a further 5 centimeters (2 inches) to 10 centimeters (4 inches) of snow during the day.



A special weather statement had ended shortly after 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, by which time areas around Toronto had already received 20 to 30 centimeters of snow early on Tuesday, the weather department said on its website.



Sheridan College, Brock University, Mohawk College and McMaster University all in Ontario province were closed, according to a local media report.



A snowstorm hit the U.S. Northeast on Tuesday, with blizzard warnings in parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Main and Vermont.





(Reporting by Anna Mehler Paperny and Denny Thomas; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)


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Canadian church group denied entry to US to help Hurricane Sandy relief effort

US border officials were concerned that foreign volunteers would ‘steal American jobs’ in New Jersey, one Ontario church member said

us canada border

US Customs and Border Protection claimed it tried to help the group of church volunteers cross US-Canadian border but had to turn them away over lack of proper documentation.
Photograph: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Canadian church group denied entry to US over fears they would ‘steal’ jobs

US border officials were concerned that foreign volunteers would ‘steal American jobs’ in New Jersey, one Ontario church member said

A group of Canadian church volunteers hoping to carry out relief work in New Jersey said they were denied entry to the US over fears that they would be “stealing” American jobs.

The Rehoboth United Reformed church, based in Hamilton, Ontario, had spent months organising its March break trip. The plan was to spend the week helping a central New Jersey church in its ongoing efforts to rebuild homes hit by Hurricane Sandy.

“This trip falls in the ‘love your neighbour’ category,” said Erik Hoeksema of the group. “We typically send groups down every two or three years to do similar projects.”

The 12-member group set off on Saturday. But their road trip came to an abrupt halt at the US border, after officials told them the host church in the US should have provided documentation in advance outlining exactly what they would be doing while in the US.

“This was a bit of mistake on our part, and the reason why we got ‘red-flagged’ to start with,” said Hoeksema. “But in the end, I was told that this was not the reason for us being denied entry.”

Members of the church had volunteered south of the border before, taking part in projects in Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Canadians do not need a visa if they are volunteering in the US, as long as they are able to show that they will not be compensated for their work.

The Reformed Church of Highland Park in central New Jersey responded immediately, sending over a letter that explained that the group was going to join the 3,000 volunteers who have so far helped 200 families get back into homes damaged by Hurricane Sandy.

Border officials said the letter was not specific enough. Hoeksema asked the host church to send another letter, this time specifying the types of duties that the group would be carrying out.

A second letter soon arrived, explaining that mission groups who travel to New Jersey carry out team building, tour programs that range from food pantries and thrift shops and assist with neighbourhood cleanup projects.

It was this last line that border officials seemingly took issue with, said Hoeksema. “This was interpreted as ‘work for hire’ and since we are foreigners, this would be stealing American jobs.”

Some five years after Hurricane Sandy hit the region, the need to carry out relief work was also questioned. “We were told that when there is an immediate need, volunteer groups usually are granted entrance,” said Hoeksema.

After more than two hours spent at the border, the group – all of whom were carrying Canadian passports and who had travelled to the US before with no incident – was denied entry.

The incident comes as Girl Guides of Canada announced it was cancelling all travel to the US. Recent months have seen a rash of reports of Canadians turned away at the border, from would-be demonstrators hoping to attend the Women’s March on Washington to a Canadian citizen who was quizzed about her Muslim faith and her views on Trump.

US Customs and Border Protection said it had attempted to assist the group of church volunteers, but ultimately had had to turn them away over a lack of proper documentation. In a statement, the agency said it is responsible for enforcing US laws and regulations that “safeguard American industry, including laws that restrict employment of foreign visitors”.

Pastor Seth Kaper-Dale of New Jersey’s Reformed Church of Highland Park said his church had so far hosted seven groups from Canada since Hurricane Sandy without any issue.

Another 100 or so groups in the US have also pitched in, helping people get back into their homes with tasks that range from putting up insulation and doing drywall. “We have people living in trailers in their yards and it’s been that way for five years and we’re embarrassed by it,” said Kaper-Dale. “So we are kind of supplementing what the government hasn’t done through our volunteerism and up until this week, that was always a fine thing to do.”

He was shocked when he heard that border officials had raised concerns about American jobs to the Canadians. “This is a group of teenagers and their parents basically and they’re coming down – their church said a prayer for them and sent them on their way – to come down and just be helpful.”

The decision by border officials, “screams out stupidity”, he added. “It screams out asinine behaviour by our government to say a group of 12 volunteers from the church are going to do damage to the American economy by helping people who are poor.”

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Canadian church group denied entry to US over fears they would 'steal' jobs

US border officials were concerned that foreign volunteers would ‘steal American jobs’ in New Jersey, one Ontario church member said

us canada border


US Customs and Border Protection claimed it tried to help the group of church volunteers cross US-Canadian border but had to turn them away over lack of proper documentation.
Photograph: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

A group of Canadian church volunteers hoping to carry out relief work in New Jersey said they were denied entry to the US over fears that they would be “stealing” American jobs.

The Rehoboth United Reformed church, based in Hamilton, Ontario, had spent months organising its March break trip. The plan was to spend the week helping a central New Jersey church in its ongoing efforts to rebuild homes hit by Hurricane Sandy.

“This trip falls in the ‘love your neighbour’ category,” said Erik Hoeksema of the group. “We typically send groups down every two or three years to do similar projects.”

The 12-member group set off on Saturday. But their road trip came to an abrupt halt at the US border, after officials told them the host church in the US should have provided documentation in advance outlining exactly what they would be doing while in the US.

“This was a bit of mistake on our part, and the reason why we got ‘red-flagged’ to start with,” said Hoeksema. “But in the end, I was told that this was not the reason for us being denied entry.”

Members of the church had volunteered south of the border before, taking part in projects in Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Canadians do not need a visa if they are volunteering in the US, as long as they are able to show that they will not be compensated for their work.

The Reformed Church of Highland Park in central New Jersey responded immediately, sending over a letter that explained that the group was going to join the 3,000 volunteers who have so far helped 200 families get back into homes damaged by Hurricane Sandy.

Border officials said the letter was not specific enough. Hoeksema asked the host church to send another letter, this time specifying the types of duties that the group would be carrying out.

A second letter soon arrived, explaining that mission groups who travel to New Jersey carry out team building, tour programs that range from food pantries and thrift shops and assist with neighbourhood cleanup projects.

It was this last line that border officials seemingly took issue with, said Hoeksema. “This was interpreted as ‘work for hire’ and since we are foreigners, this would be stealing American jobs.”

Some five years after Hurricane Sandy hit the region, the need to carry out relief work was also questioned. “We were told that when there is an immediate need, volunteer groups usually are granted entrance,” said Hoeksema.

After more than two hours spent at the border, the group – all of whom were carrying Canadian passports and who had travelled to the US before with no incident – was denied entry.

The incident comes as Girl Guides of Canada announced it was cancelling all travel to the US. Recent months have seen a rash of reports of Canadians turned away at the border, from would-be demonstrators hoping to attend the Women’s March on Washington to a Canadian citizen who was quizzed about her Muslim faith and her views on Trump.

US Customs and Border Protection said it had attempted to assist the group of church volunteers, but ultimately had had to turn them away over a lack of proper documentation. In a statement, the agency said it is responsible for enforcing US laws and regulations that “safeguard American industry, including laws that restrict employment of foreign visitors”.

Pastor Seth Kaper-Dale of New Jersey’s Reformed Church of Highland Park said his church had so far hosted seven groups from Canada since Hurricane Sandy without any issue.

Another 100 or so groups in the US have also pitched in, helping people get back into their homes with tasks that range from putting up insulation and doing drywall. “We have people living in trailers in their yards and it’s been that way for five years and we’re embarrassed by it,” said Kaper-Dale. “So we are kind of supplementing what the government hasn’t done through our volunteerism and up until this week, that was always a fine thing to do.”

He was shocked when he heard that border officials had raised concerns about American jobs to the Canadians. “This is a group of teenagers and their parents basically and they’re coming down – their church said a prayer for them and sent them on their way – to come down and just be helpful.”

The decision by border officials, “screams out stupidity”, he added. “It screams out asinine behaviour by our government to say a group of 12 volunteers from the church are going to do damage to the American economy by helping people who are poor.”

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New law in Canada would ban employers from forcing high heels on women

Lawmakers in Canada are working on legislation that would put an end to high heel requirements for female employees in the workplace.

Christy Clark, the premier of the western province of British Columbia, on Sunday tweeted her support for a private member’s bill put forward by Green Party leader Andrew Weaver that pushes to make it illegal for businesses to enforce footwear requirements based on gender.

She said that she agrees “100%” with the idea of not forcing women to wear heels at work.

“We’ll move to end this,” she added.

Separately, on her Facebook page, Ms Clark wrote: “In some workplaces in BC, women are still required to wear high heels on the job. This isn’t just old-fashioned; in 2017, it’s unacceptable.”

Mr Weaver last week, on International Women’s Day, proposed a bill designed to “prevent employers from setting varying footwear and other requirements based on gender, gender expression or gender identity. “

According to local news reports, Ms Clark told a news conference her government is looking at the “quickest and simplest” way to implement the change.

The Canadian province isn’t alone in taking on the issue.

In the UK, MPs recently debated a ban on employers demanding that women wear high heels in the workplace, in response to a petition started by receptionist Nicola Thorpe.

The petition asked for dress code laws to be changed so women have the option to wear flat formal shoes in the workplace. It came after Ms Thorpe was sent home from work  in December 2015 for not wearing high heels.

Some 152,000 people backed Ms Thorpe’s  call and the campaign prompted the Government’s Petitions Committee and Women and Equalities Committee to conduct a joint review of workplace dress codes.


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Canada Revenue Agency suspends some online services due to threat

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) said on Sunday that it has resumed all its online services after taking down some applications for nearly two days due to a security threat.



“We took this action as a precaution, not as the result of a successful hack or breach,” CRA, Canada’s federal tax agency, said in a statement.



CRA said it took the step after it became aware on Friday of an “internet vulnerability” affecting some computer servers used by websites worldwide. It did not make clear the nature of the threat.



Canadians have until May 1 to file their income tax returns and benefits, which makes the current period a busy one with online users.



CRA said it could not immediately comment on the seriousness of the threat or whether this was the first time its services had been taken off line due to security concerns.



The agency said it worked with other government departments over the past 48 hours to implement a solution. “We are now confident that the solution has been rigorously and successfully tested and services returned online,” the statement added.





(Reporting by Denny Thomas; Editing by Sandra Maler and Will Dunham)


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U.S. beats Canada, advances to second round of World Baseball Classic

Nolan Arenado and Buster Posey homered and drove in three runs apiece to help the United States earn a berth in the second round of the World Baseball Classic with an 8-0 victory against Canada on Sunday night.

The Americans finished 2-1 in pool play and bounced back from a tough loss Saturday, when they blew a five-run lead and were beaten by the Dominican Republic 7-5. The U.S. team failed to reach the final in the three previous WBCs.

The Dominicans also advanced to the second round in San Diego by beating Colombia 10-3 in 11 innings Sunday. The Dominicans, who won the 2013 tournament, finished 3-0 in the first round.

Canada went 0-3.

Danny Duffy became the third consecutive U.S. starter to turn in a scoreless outing. He struck out seven in four innings, and the only baserunners against him were Jonathan Malo and Peter Orr on consecutive two-out singles in the third.

Duffy, Chris Archer and Marcus Stroman combined for 12 2/3 scoreless innings in their starts.

The Americans’ relievers combined for five shutout innings after giving up nine runs in 9 1/3 innings in the first two games. Tyler Clippard retired all six batters he faced, striking out four.

The crowd of 22,303 was smaller and more subdued than for the games involving the Dominican Republic, but there was some flag-waving and chanting for the U.S. team.

The home team gave fans something to cheer about from the start. Canada starter Ryan Dempster, who came out of retirement to pitch in the WBC, recorded just two outs and lasted only two-thirds of an inning and was charged with three runs.

Eric Hosmer hit a two-run double in the first inning to put the Americans ahead, and another run scored on Posey’s groundout.

After Adam Jones and Christian Yelich hit consecutive singles in the second, Arenado homered to make it 6-0. It was the first homer for the Americans in the tournament.

Posey hit a solo homer in the seventh. Posey, Yelich, Jones, Hosmer and Brandon Crawford had two hits apiece.


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Canada Revenue Agency resumes online services after 2-day outage

(Recasts with resumption of services)

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)
said on Sunday that it has resumed all its online services after
taking down some applications for nearly two days due to a
security threat.

“We took this action as a precaution, not as the result of a
successful hack or breach,” CRA, Canada’s federal tax agency,
said in a statement.

CRA said it took the step after it became aware on Friday of
an “internet vulnerability” affecting some computer servers used
by websites worldwide. It did not make clear the nature of the
threat.

Canadians have until May 1 to file their income tax returns
and benefits, which makes the current period a busy one with
online users.

CRA said it could not immediately comment on the seriousness
of the threat or whether this was the first time its services
had been taken off line due to security concerns.

The agency said it worked with other government departments
over the past 48 hours to implement a solution. “We are now
confident that the solution has been rigorously and successfully
tested and services returned online,” the statement added.

(Reporting by Denny Thomas; Editing by Sandra Maler and Will
Dunham)


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Holiday bomb threats target 5 Jewish centers in US, Canada

Story highlights

  • Rochester JCC one of at least five to report threats on Jewish holiday
  • One person has been arrested in connection with a small portion of this year’s calls
None of the threats proved real in the latest wave of intimidating acts targeting the Jewish community.
For some centers, though, it was not their first ordeal.
The Louis S. Wolk Jewish Community Center in Rochester, New York, was evacuated Sunday morning for the second time in less than a week.
The center was hosting a “warming center” for people whose homes had lost power when the bomb threat came, Executive Director Arnie Sohinki said.
It reopened without incident a few hours later after receiving an all-clear from law enforcement, Sohinki said. he would not provide further details, citing the police investigation.
“We are open. We will remain open. Whoever is doing this doesn’t realize this only makes us #stronger, ” the center said in a Facebook post. “All are welcome to join us at the JCC.”

Threats in the US and Canada

The Rochester JCC was one of several Jewish institutions to receive a bomb threat on Sunday. The threats coincided with the Jewish holiday of Purim, a festive commemoration of the defeat of a plot to exterminate Jews in ancient Persia.
Other locations reporting similar threats included Indianapolis Jewish Community Center in Indiana; the Jewish Community Center of Greater Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada; and The Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All reopened a few hours later without incident.
The Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center of Houston also received a bomb threat — its second in three weeks, Executive Vice President Joel Dinkin said. The center, which received the threat via email, was not evacuated.
Jewish center bomb threats: What the callers said
The threats were the latest acts in a recent wave of anti-Semitic incidents across the United States. Museums, houses of worship, advocacy groups and cemeteries have been targets of bomb threats and vandalism as federal officials work with state and local authorities to find those responsible.
One person has been arrested in connection with a small portion of the calls. The head of police intelligence for New York City said he believes one person is responsible for most of the nationwide calls and the rest are the work of copycats. CNN was unable to confirm or corroborate his theory. Meanwhile, law enforcement officials have said they believe many of the threatening calls originated overseas.
Sunday’s incidents bring the number of threats since January in the United States and Canada to 154, according to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism.

FBI investigation continues

The Louis S. Wolk JCC also received a bomb threat on Tuesday, March 7, the same day another center in Syracuse and the Anti-Defamation League’s New York City headquarters received threats. No devices were found at the locations and the centers reopened soon after.
After the first bomb threat, the Rochester center had opened its doors to those who lost power in a winter storm blanketing the Northeast. Sen. Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, called the bomb threat “despicable” given the center’s service to the community.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the incident “cowardly,” especially on a holiday weekend celebrating “the resiliency of the Jewish people.”
“Like all New Yorkers, I am profoundly disturbed and disgusted by the continued threats against the Jewish community in New York. As New Yorkers, we will not be intimidated and we will not stand by silently as some seek to sow hate and division. New York is one family, and an attack on one is an attack on all,” he said in a statement.
Cuomo said he would direct state police to investigate the bomb threats in conjunction with federal officials. Last week, Cuomo and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio increased a reward for information on hate crimes — not just bomb threats — to $20,000.
The FBI and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division vowed to investigate possible civil rights violations in connection with the threats.
“The FBI will collect all available facts and evidence, and will ensure this matter is investigated in a fair, thorough, and impartial manner. As this matter is ongoing, we are not able to comment further at this time,” the federal agency said.
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