Remarks for the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change at the Toronto Region Board of Trade

Friday, November 25, 2016

Check against delivery. This speech has been translated in accordance with the Government of Canada’s official languages policy and edited for posting and distribution in accordance with its communications policy.

I would like to begin by acknowledging that the land we are on is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (HO-Dehn-Oh-show-knee), the Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Indigenous peoples are the first stewards of our water, air, and land, and we must work in partnership to protect our environment.

Thank you, everyone, for the warm welcome. It’s great to be back. The Board of Trade is a longtime pillar of the Canadian business community and a cornerstone to the success of this great city.

Our world has come a long way since the Board of Trade was created in the 1850s, on the dusty streets of Toronto.

First of all, we live, on …
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Remarks for the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change

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TORONTO, Nov. 25, 2016 /CNW/ –

[Introduction]

I would like to begin by acknowledging that the land we are on is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (HO-Dehn-Oh-show-knee), the Métis, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.  

Indigenous peoples are the first stewards of our water, air, and land, and we must work in partnership to protect our environment.

[Pause]

Thank you, everyone, for the warm welcome. It’s great to be back. The Board of Trade is a longtime pillar of the Canadian business community and a cornerstone to the success of this great city.   


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CanadaTrump presidency poses 'existential' economic threat to Canada: Manley

Mike Blanchfield, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Nov 23, 2016, Last Updated: 7:16 PM ET

OTTAWA — A former Liberal cabinet minister and leader of a major Canadian business group says Donald Trump’s impending presidency poses an economic threat to Canada that’s on par with the 9/11 attacks on the United States.
John Manley, the president of the Business Council of Canada, is urging the Liberal government to respond to Trump’s anti-trade rhetoric in order to keep goods and people flowing across the busiest border in the world.
“This is existential for Canada. This is the heart that beats (in) our economy so we just can’t get this wrong,” Manley said in an interview Wednesday.
“We have to see it as the same … almost existential threat that 9/11 was.”
Earlier this week, Trump released a YouTube video vowing to withdraw the U.S. from the 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership.
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He was silent on …