Is Canada in the midst of an influx of migration from Mexico?

After Canada relaxed travel restrictions in December, the number of visitors from Mexico has tripled. Some are asking whether that might have just as much to do with the United States as with Canada.

Several Canadian immigration lawyers, consultants, and activists told Reuters in recent days that their offices have seen a surge of requests for advice from Mexicans hoping to obtain a work permit there.

Marcela Gonzalez, an immigration paralegal in Toronto, said she once got about four phone inquiries a month from Mexican citizens there. 

“Now I get four in less than 10 minutes” from Mexicans asking about work authorization and permanent residency in Canada, she told the news service.

And dozens of would-be migrants in a Reynosa shelter who were deported from the United States said they now see Canada as their more viable option, in what might suggest at least a partial shift during President Trump’s first months in office.

“For those without documents, I think [the United States] is over. Now it’s Canada’s turn,” said Cenobio Rita, a deportee who spoke to Reuters.

It remains unclear how many of the 61,500 Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) forms granted to Mexican citizens for short-term visits to Canada between December and late February were allotted to vacationers or other types of visitors, as opposed to people hoping to stay to work. That should become clearer in June, when the allotted visit period for many travelers begins to end.

Mexicans who hope to secure work authorization there, but lack skills in high-demand fields, may be disappointed, lawyers say, noting that without an employer’s sponsorship, authorization is hard to get for those visiting on a tourist visa. As The Christian Science Monitor’s Sara Miller Llana noted in January, the 250,000 immigrants accepted by Canada per year are mostly selected through a point system that favors young people with skills in high demand.

When undocumented foreigners have arrived unexpectedly in Canada like they do in Europe or the US across the Mexican border, they haven’t been welcome. In 2010 when a cargo ship carrying 492 Tamil asylum seekers docked, a majority of Canadians wanted the ship turned away, polls showed.

“There’s nothing unique about the Canadian psyche; human beings get quite upset when they feel their territorial space is being violated,” [Calgary political scientist and conservative strategist Tom] Flanagan says.

And though the government of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has positioned itself as the antithesis of Mr. Trump on immigration, the elimination of the visa requirement for Mexicans was no historic reversal: The restriction imposed by Mr. Trudeau’s conservative predecessor, Stephen Harper, was a means of cutting down on the thousands of asylum claims filed by Mexicans there.

Even those granted eTAs may not ultimately be allowed to enter Canada, as immigration officials suspicious that a visitor may want to overstay can ask leading questions of would-be immigrants. And those convicted of crimes abroad are deemed inadmissible by authorities.

Official Canadian data obtained by Reuters showed that 313 Mexicans with eTAs were turned away when attempting to enter Canada in January – more than the annual totals in 2012, 2013, or 2014.

When asked whether Canada was seeing an uptick of migrants from Mexico, Camielle Edwards, a spokeswoman for Immigration and Refugee Minister Ahmed Hussen, told Reuters the ministry would “carefully monitor migration trends regarding Mexican travelers to Canada, including asylum claim rates.”

This report contains material by Reuters.

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FORTE: Canada Blooms celebrates Canada's 150th

Canada Blooms, now in its 21st year, is at the Enercare Centre at Exhibition Place in Toronto until Sunday.

The show opens daily at 10 a.m. — beat the crowds and arrive early, parking is a breeze for early birds. The crowds subside about 4 p.m., meaning shorter lineups to see the display gardens. The show is open until 9 p.m. daily, except Sunday when it winds up at 5 p.m.

Exhibition Place has a GO station located right on its grounds. The station name is Exhibition and is one stop west of Union Station on the East-West Lakeshore line. For more information contact GO Transit.

Wear comfortable walking shoes and bring a bottle of water, the garden festival alone covers 2.4 hectares, and the National Home Show is also on site — your ticket gets you in to both shows.

Don’t forget to stop by the marketplace for unusual plants, seeds, garden supplies and gadgets, and visit the flower competitions hosted by the Garden Club of Toronto featuring regional, national and international competitors.

Visit www.canadablooms.com for details about the speaker and workshop schedules, show details or to order tickets online. 

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Air Canada's Chief Says U.S. Becoming More Competitive (Correct)

(Bloomberg) — U.S. President Donald Trump’s plans to cut taxes and regulations look more favorable to business than Canadian policies, according to Air Canada’s chief executive officer.

“This industry isn’t from a taxation perspective adequately competitive, we know the U.S. is about to become even more competitive,” Calin Rovinescu said.

Canadian airlines will be hurt by plans to introduce a carbon tax and may suffer if the government’s intention of privatizing airports raises costs, he said. Airport rents and landing fees in the country already rank among the highest in the world, according to a 2016 study by the Montreal Economic Institute think tank.

Canada’s biggest airline has focused its growth plans on carrying international passengers through hubs such as Toronto and Vancouver, a strategy that relies partly on smooth traffic from the U.S. While Trump has said he wants to rework the North American Free Trade Agreement and limit travel from some countries, such changes won’t hurt Montreal-based Air Canada, Rovinescu said in an interview Tuesday.

“We will be able to do a lot of business” with the U.S., he said. “My sense of the border dynamics between Canada and the U.S. is that it won’t become more complicated, indeed it may well become more transparent from a commercial perspective.”

Rail Rivals

Some of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s policies could benefit airlines that are hurting from taxes and fees that often account for 60 percent of a plane ticket’s price, Rovinescu said. Canada is studying increased passenger rail service around Montreal and Toronto, which could move travelers to larger hub airports, although competition for passengers might increase, he said.

“Good competition makes companies more competitive,” he said.

The CEO also hopes to improve Air Canada’s agreement with Aimia Inc., which administers the carrier’s Aeroplan loyalty program.

“We are having good discussions,” he said. “There’s no doubt that Air Canada will make some substantial gains coming out of that.”

Aimia is the biggest purchaser of seats on Air Canada, having paid the airline
almost C$700 million ($525 million) in 2015, according to Neil Linsdell, an analyst at Industrial Alliance Securities. Air Canada, which buys miles to give its frequent fliers under Aeroplan, paid Aimia C$245 million the same year, he said. 

The deal expires in 2020, and Air Canada will likely reduce the percentage of seats that it holds for Aeroplan members, Linsdell said. 

“It’s very clear to me that they are going to revise some of the terms,” he said.

Air Canada shares rose 17 cents to C$13.36 in Toronto.

(Corrects headline to remove reference to political leaders.)

©2017 Bloomberg L.P.

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Canada's banks face intensifying scrutiny of sales practices

* Regulatory, political scrutiny set to intensify

* Lawmakers call for parliamentary investigation

* Regulator says review will begin in April

* FCAC says issues have been raised with bank CEOs

* Banks defend practices after latest allegations

(Recasts, adds comments by analyst, lawmakers)

By Matt Scuffham

TORONTO, March 15 Canada’s banks faced
intensifying scrutiny on Wednesday after the country’s financial
watchdog launched an investigation and lawmakers called for a
parliamentary inquiry following media reports suggesting
improper sales practices at certain banks.

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) Commissioner
Lucie Tedesco expressed concern over the reports by CBC News
that employees at some of the country’s largest banks had opened
accounts for products and services for consumers without
properly obtaining their expressed consent, an issue the
regulator said it will focus on in a review to begin in
mid-April.

Canadian banks have until now avoided the consumer
mis-selling scandals that had affected banks in the United
States and Europe in recent years. However, some analysts said
banks in Canada have therefore been subject to lighter
regulatory scrutiny, enabling them to engage in sales practices
no longer deemed acceptable elsewhere.

The banks named by in the reports by CBC News have all
subsequently defended their sales practices.

“The lack of scandals has led to Canada avoiding the
regulatory scrutiny of sales practices seen in other markets, in
particular the UK. We think this could now change, putting some
pressure on profitability,” said Citi analyst Stefan Nedialkov.

British banks have so far paid out more than 24 billion
pounds ($29 billion) compensating customers who were mis-sold
loan insurance and Spanish banks face a bill of nearly 4 billion
euros ($4.25 billion) after a 2013 court ruling that they sold
mortgages to around 1.5 million customers without explaining
interest rates could not fall below a certain level.

Sales practices at banks in the United States have come
under scrutiny after Wells Fargo & Co reached a $185
million settlement in September with U.S. authorities after
admitting branch staff had opened up to 2 million unauthorized
customer accounts amid pressure to meet internal sales goals.

Two lawmakers who sit on Canada’s House of Commons Standing
Committee on Finance said on Wednesday that banks’ business
practices and the effectiveness of financial regulation in
Canada should be examined by the committee.

“Is it adequate enough? Do they have enough power?,” asked
Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette. “Part of our role is not
only to hold the government to account but the entire financial
system.”

Conservative MP Dan Albas called on the FCAC and Canada’s
finance ministry to explain how they are responding to the
concerns and to address questions around the effectives of
regulators.

“I’d like to see the Minister of Finance (Bill Morneau) tell
us whether he believes the current framework works,” he said.

Canada’s finance ministry reiterated on Wednesday it was
confident the FCAC would examine the issue carefully.

CBC News had reported last week that customers of
Toronto-Dominion Bank were moved to higher-fee accounts
or had their overdraft and credit card limits increased without
their knowledge after staffers came under pressure to meet sales
targets.

On Wednesday, CBC News reported that employees at the
nation’s other biggest banks – Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of
Montreal, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and Scotiabank –
said they had engaged in similar practices.

The banks have all defended their practices.

Royal Bank of Canada said in a statement that its
employees “embrace the responsibility of putting our clients’
needs at the center of all we do.”

Bank of Montreal said in a statement it is
committed to “putting customers and employees first” and
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce said its staff are
“incentivised to do what is right for our clients.”

Bank of Nova Scotia said in a statement that all
employees are “focused on the needs of our customers.”

TD has defended its practices.

Shares in Scotiabank and Bank of Montreal were down 1
percent on Wednesday. Shares in CIBC fell 0.7 percent. Shares in
TD and RBC were down 0.3 percent.

($1 = 0.8195 pounds)
($1 = 0.9408 euros)

(Additional reporting by Leah Schnurr; Editing by Jeffrey
Benkoe and Meredith Mazzilli)


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Air Canada's Chief Says U.S. Policies Won't Hinder Business (1)

(Bloomberg) — U.S. President Donald Trump’s plans to cut taxes and regulations look more favorable to business than Canadian policies, according to Air Canada’s chief executive officer.

“This industry isn’t from a taxation perspective adequately competitive, we know the U.S. is about to become even more competitive,” Calin Rovinescu said.

Canadian airlines will be hurt by plans to introduce a carbon tax and may suffer if the government’s intention of privatizing airports raises costs, he said. Airport rents and landing fees in the country already rank among the highest in the world, according to a 2016 study by the Montreal Economic Institute think tank.

Canada’s biggest airline has focused its growth plans on carrying international passengers through hubs such as Toronto and Vancouver, a strategy that relies partly on smooth traffic from the U.S. While Trump has said he wants to rework the North American Free Trade Agreement and limit travel from some countries, such changes won’t hurt Montreal-based Air Canada, Rovinescu said in an interview Tuesday.

“We will be able to do a lot of business” with the U.S., he said. “My sense of the border dynamics between Canada and the U.S. is that it won’t become more complicated, indeed it may well become more transparent from a commercial perspective.”

Rail Rivals

Some of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s policies could benefit airlines that are hurting from taxes and fees that often account for 60 percent of a plane ticket’s price, Rovinescu said. Canada is studying increased passenger rail service around Montreal and Toronto, which could move travelers to larger hub airports, although competition for passengers might increase, he said.

“Good competition makes companies more competitive,” he said.

The CEO also hopes to improve Air Canada’s agreement with Aimia Inc., which administers the carrier’s Aeroplan loyalty program.

“We are having good discussions,” he said. “There’s no doubt that Air Canada will make some substantial gains coming out of that.”

Aimia is the biggest purchaser of seats on Air Canada, having paid the airline
almost C$700 million ($525 million) in 2015, according to Neil Linsdell, an analyst at Industrial Alliance Securities. Air Canada, which buys miles to give its frequent fliers under Aeroplan, paid Aimia C$245 million the same year, he said. 

The deal expires in 2020, and Air Canada will likely reduce the percentage of seats that it holds for Aeroplan members, Linsdell said. 

“It’s very clear to me that they are going to revise some of the terms,” he said.

Air Canada shares rose 17 cents to C$13.36 in Toronto.

(Corrects headline to remove reference to political leaders.)

©2017 Bloomberg L.P.

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Canada Goose prices IPO at C$17 per share

The issue will raise C$340 million.

The maker of luxury winter down jackets had earlier expected to price the offering of 20 million shares at C$14-C$16 per share.

The Toronto-based company will list its subordinate voting shares on the New York Stock Exchange and the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbol “GOOS”.

Canada Goose, which started in a small warehouse in 1957, sold a majority stake in 2013 to Bain Capital LLC, for an undisclosed amount, to help meet its growth ambitions.

The down used in Canada Goose coats, which sell for as much as $700 apiece, is a byproduct of the food industry, with most of it sourced from Hutterite farmers who raise free-range flocks in the Canadian prairies.

Down jackets are insulated with soft and warm underfeathers from duck or geese.

CIBC Capital Markets, Credit Suisse, Goldman Sachs & Co and RBC Capital Markets are lead underwriters to the offering.

(Reporting by Nikhil Subba in Bengaluru, Additional reporting by Parikshit Mishra; Editing by Vyas Mohan)


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Canadian Girl Guides cancel US travel ahead of ban

Girl Guides of Canada has cancelled all trips to the United States until further notice because it fears problems at the border.

The announcement comes days before President Donald Trump’s new US travel ban comes into effect on Thursday.

In a statement, the group said the “ability of all our members to equally enter this country is currently uncertain”.

The suspension includes short trips and all travel through US airports.

The group has also scrapped a planned summer camping trip to California in favour of an alternate destination.

Sarah Kiriliuk, national manager of marketing and communications for the Girl Guides of Canada, said the decision was “absolutely not” political but instead an operational decision made over a “general uncertainty” around Canada-US border travel.

“Girl Guides is a microcosm of Canada,” she said.

“We’re diverse, we’re multicultural. I don’t want to speak to any one girl or situation, our main priority was making sure our girls who had been planning trips for up to a year sometimes weren’t going to be turned away at the border because of one or more situations that were beyond their control.”

Under the new US travel ban, all nationals from Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen will not be permitted to enter the US or be issued an immigrant or non-immigrant visa for a 90-day period.

Ms Kiriliuk could not say how many members might have been barred from US entry under the new temporary ban, if any.

“At Girl Guides of Canada, we know our members value the safe, inclusive and accepting space that Guiding provides,” the statement said.

It went on: “These values are reflected in all we do, including the Girl Guide travel experiences we offer girls and women. This was a very difficult decision to make. We hope that members will appreciate this reflects our commitment to inclusivity and equal opportunities for all girls and women.”

The Girl Guides of Canada has chapters in provinces across the country and some 70,000 members and 20,000 adult female volunteers.

Any US visits already booked and paid for by regional Girl Guide chapters prior to the announcement would be reviewed on a “case-by-case” basis, Ms Kiriliuk said.

Some Canadian schools have also cancelled trips to the US in the wake of the travel ban, including the Greater Essex County District School Board in south-western Ontario.

According to figures provided by US Customs and Border Protection, the number of people being denied entry at the Canada-US boundary is roughly in line with previous years.

But confusion during the first few days of the previous US travel ban, which was eventually blocked by a federal court, and a series of recent incidents of Canadians going public with their experience being turned away at the border has led to questions over whether people are facing tougher measures when entering the US.

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Snowstorm forces Canada's biggest airport to cancel 100 flights

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada’s biggest airport canceled more than a hundred flights on Tuesday as a late winter storm brought more snow to southern Ontario, forcing several colleges to suspend classes.



About 26 percent of all departures and arrivals at Pearson International Airport, which serves the Toronto area, were canceled, with affected flights “mostly those scheduled for or from areas affected by the current weather system,” an airport spokeswoman said in an email.



More disruptions in Ontario were expected with Environment Canada forecasting a further 5 centimeters (2 inches) to 10 centimeters (4 inches) of snow during the day.



A special weather statement had ended shortly after 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, by which time areas around Toronto had already received 20 to 30 centimeters of snow early on Tuesday, the weather department said on its website.



Sheridan College, Brock University, Mohawk College and McMaster University all in Ontario province were closed, according to a local media report.



A snowstorm hit the U.S. Northeast on Tuesday, with blizzard warnings in parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Main and Vermont.





(Reporting by Anna Mehler Paperny and Denny Thomas; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)


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Canadian church group denied entry to US to help Hurricane Sandy relief effort

US border officials were concerned that foreign volunteers would ‘steal American jobs’ in New Jersey, one Ontario church member said

us canada border

US Customs and Border Protection claimed it tried to help the group of church volunteers cross US-Canadian border but had to turn them away over lack of proper documentation.
Photograph: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Canadian church group denied entry to US over fears they would ‘steal’ jobs

US border officials were concerned that foreign volunteers would ‘steal American jobs’ in New Jersey, one Ontario church member said

A group of Canadian church volunteers hoping to carry out relief work in New Jersey said they were denied entry to the US over fears that they would be “stealing” American jobs.

The Rehoboth United Reformed church, based in Hamilton, Ontario, had spent months organising its March break trip. The plan was to spend the week helping a central New Jersey church in its ongoing efforts to rebuild homes hit by Hurricane Sandy.

“This trip falls in the ‘love your neighbour’ category,” said Erik Hoeksema of the group. “We typically send groups down every two or three years to do similar projects.”

The 12-member group set off on Saturday. But their road trip came to an abrupt halt at the US border, after officials told them the host church in the US should have provided documentation in advance outlining exactly what they would be doing while in the US.

“This was a bit of mistake on our part, and the reason why we got ‘red-flagged’ to start with,” said Hoeksema. “But in the end, I was told that this was not the reason for us being denied entry.”

Members of the church had volunteered south of the border before, taking part in projects in Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Canadians do not need a visa if they are volunteering in the US, as long as they are able to show that they will not be compensated for their work.

The Reformed Church of Highland Park in central New Jersey responded immediately, sending over a letter that explained that the group was going to join the 3,000 volunteers who have so far helped 200 families get back into homes damaged by Hurricane Sandy.

Border officials said the letter was not specific enough. Hoeksema asked the host church to send another letter, this time specifying the types of duties that the group would be carrying out.

A second letter soon arrived, explaining that mission groups who travel to New Jersey carry out team building, tour programs that range from food pantries and thrift shops and assist with neighbourhood cleanup projects.

It was this last line that border officials seemingly took issue with, said Hoeksema. “This was interpreted as ‘work for hire’ and since we are foreigners, this would be stealing American jobs.”

Some five years after Hurricane Sandy hit the region, the need to carry out relief work was also questioned. “We were told that when there is an immediate need, volunteer groups usually are granted entrance,” said Hoeksema.

After more than two hours spent at the border, the group – all of whom were carrying Canadian passports and who had travelled to the US before with no incident – was denied entry.

The incident comes as Girl Guides of Canada announced it was cancelling all travel to the US. Recent months have seen a rash of reports of Canadians turned away at the border, from would-be demonstrators hoping to attend the Women’s March on Washington to a Canadian citizen who was quizzed about her Muslim faith and her views on Trump.

US Customs and Border Protection said it had attempted to assist the group of church volunteers, but ultimately had had to turn them away over a lack of proper documentation. In a statement, the agency said it is responsible for enforcing US laws and regulations that “safeguard American industry, including laws that restrict employment of foreign visitors”.

Pastor Seth Kaper-Dale of New Jersey’s Reformed Church of Highland Park said his church had so far hosted seven groups from Canada since Hurricane Sandy without any issue.

Another 100 or so groups in the US have also pitched in, helping people get back into their homes with tasks that range from putting up insulation and doing drywall. “We have people living in trailers in their yards and it’s been that way for five years and we’re embarrassed by it,” said Kaper-Dale. “So we are kind of supplementing what the government hasn’t done through our volunteerism and up until this week, that was always a fine thing to do.”

He was shocked when he heard that border officials had raised concerns about American jobs to the Canadians. “This is a group of teenagers and their parents basically and they’re coming down – their church said a prayer for them and sent them on their way – to come down and just be helpful.”

The decision by border officials, “screams out stupidity”, he added. “It screams out asinine behaviour by our government to say a group of 12 volunteers from the church are going to do damage to the American economy by helping people who are poor.”

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Canadian church group denied entry to US over fears they would 'steal' jobs

US border officials were concerned that foreign volunteers would ‘steal American jobs’ in New Jersey, one Ontario church member said

us canada border


US Customs and Border Protection claimed it tried to help the group of church volunteers cross US-Canadian border but had to turn them away over lack of proper documentation.
Photograph: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

A group of Canadian church volunteers hoping to carry out relief work in New Jersey said they were denied entry to the US over fears that they would be “stealing” American jobs.

The Rehoboth United Reformed church, based in Hamilton, Ontario, had spent months organising its March break trip. The plan was to spend the week helping a central New Jersey church in its ongoing efforts to rebuild homes hit by Hurricane Sandy.

“This trip falls in the ‘love your neighbour’ category,” said Erik Hoeksema of the group. “We typically send groups down every two or three years to do similar projects.”

The 12-member group set off on Saturday. But their road trip came to an abrupt halt at the US border, after officials told them the host church in the US should have provided documentation in advance outlining exactly what they would be doing while in the US.

“This was a bit of mistake on our part, and the reason why we got ‘red-flagged’ to start with,” said Hoeksema. “But in the end, I was told that this was not the reason for us being denied entry.”

Members of the church had volunteered south of the border before, taking part in projects in Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Canadians do not need a visa if they are volunteering in the US, as long as they are able to show that they will not be compensated for their work.

The Reformed Church of Highland Park in central New Jersey responded immediately, sending over a letter that explained that the group was going to join the 3,000 volunteers who have so far helped 200 families get back into homes damaged by Hurricane Sandy.

Border officials said the letter was not specific enough. Hoeksema asked the host church to send another letter, this time specifying the types of duties that the group would be carrying out.

A second letter soon arrived, explaining that mission groups who travel to New Jersey carry out team building, tour programs that range from food pantries and thrift shops and assist with neighbourhood cleanup projects.

It was this last line that border officials seemingly took issue with, said Hoeksema. “This was interpreted as ‘work for hire’ and since we are foreigners, this would be stealing American jobs.”

Some five years after Hurricane Sandy hit the region, the need to carry out relief work was also questioned. “We were told that when there is an immediate need, volunteer groups usually are granted entrance,” said Hoeksema.

After more than two hours spent at the border, the group – all of whom were carrying Canadian passports and who had travelled to the US before with no incident – was denied entry.

The incident comes as Girl Guides of Canada announced it was cancelling all travel to the US. Recent months have seen a rash of reports of Canadians turned away at the border, from would-be demonstrators hoping to attend the Women’s March on Washington to a Canadian citizen who was quizzed about her Muslim faith and her views on Trump.

US Customs and Border Protection said it had attempted to assist the group of church volunteers, but ultimately had had to turn them away over a lack of proper documentation. In a statement, the agency said it is responsible for enforcing US laws and regulations that “safeguard American industry, including laws that restrict employment of foreign visitors”.

Pastor Seth Kaper-Dale of New Jersey’s Reformed Church of Highland Park said his church had so far hosted seven groups from Canada since Hurricane Sandy without any issue.

Another 100 or so groups in the US have also pitched in, helping people get back into their homes with tasks that range from putting up insulation and doing drywall. “We have people living in trailers in their yards and it’s been that way for five years and we’re embarrassed by it,” said Kaper-Dale. “So we are kind of supplementing what the government hasn’t done through our volunteerism and up until this week, that was always a fine thing to do.”

He was shocked when he heard that border officials had raised concerns about American jobs to the Canadians. “This is a group of teenagers and their parents basically and they’re coming down – their church said a prayer for them and sent them on their way – to come down and just be helpful.”

The decision by border officials, “screams out stupidity”, he added. “It screams out asinine behaviour by our government to say a group of 12 volunteers from the church are going to do damage to the American economy by helping people who are poor.”

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