German minister says Brexit 'may end EU'

Germany’s vice-chancellor has warned the future of the EU could be in doubt if the UK’s exit is handled badly.Sigmar Gabriel said the EU would go “down the drain” if other states followed Britain’s lead and that the UK could not keep the “nice things” about Europe while taking no responsibility.It comes as Theresa May summoned ministers for a meeting on Wednesday to discuss ideas for the UK’s withdrawal.Downing Street said Brexit was “top” of the prime minister’s agenda.But a report in The Sunday Times suggested her cabinet was split over leaving the single market.The UK voted to leave the European Union in a referendum vote on 23 June.Mr Gabriel, who is also economy minister in Germany’s governing coalition and Chancellor Angela Merkel’s deputy, told a news conference that as a result, the world now regarded Europe as an unstable continent.’Deep trouble'”Brexit is …
Go to Source

Chinese in Canada feel chill of Beijing’s reach


TORONTO — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is due in China on Tuesday for a much anticipated visit, hoping to reset what had been an up-and-down relationship under the previous government. Closer ties, Trudeau says, would release untapped prosperity at home and promote Canadian values like good governance and the rule of law in China.


But many Chinese-Canadians say the opposite is happening. They say the growing economic clout wielded in Canada by China, Canada’s largest trading partner after the United States, is leading to an erosion of their own freedom — specifically their freedom to speak openly about China’s authoritarian state. Journalists who write for the many Chinese-language publications in Canada, along with activists and others, say they are under increasing pressure to promote the interests of the Chinese government.


“It’s gotten worse and worse,” said Jonathan Fon, 67, a Toronto paralegal, freelance writer and critic of China’s Communist rulers.


Fon, who emigrated …

Canadian neighbours discover they were switched at birth 41 years ago 

Two men living in a remote Canadian community have discovered they were switched at birth 41 years ago.
Leon Swanson and David Tait were born three days apart at Norway House Indian Hospital in Manitoba.
Mr Swanson was born on January 31, 1975 and Mr Tait on February 3. The two men knew each other, having been raised in a Cree Nation community about 286 miles north of Winnipeg.
DNA tests revealed that Mr Swanson had been raised by Mr Tait’s biological mother and vice versa, CBC News reported.

David Tait, struggling to hold back tears at the press conference, said he felt distraught …
Go to Source

Trader Joe's lawsuit over Canadian store Pirate Joe's can proceed

 A U.S. court has the authority to hear a trademark lawsuit by grocery chain Trader Joe’s against a man who bought the company’s products and resold them in Canada at Pirate Joe’s, a store designed to mimic Trader Joe’s, a federal appeals court said Friday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a district court’s decision to dismiss California-based Trader Joe’s federal trademark claims. 
The district court in Washington state had said it lacked authority to hear those claims because the defendant’s reported trademark violations occurred in Canada and Trader Joe’s had failed to clearly explain how they affected U.S. commerce.The 9th Circuit said defendant Michael Hallatt’s conduct could harm Trader Joe’s reputation, decreasing the value of its American-held trademarks. 

Circuit Judge Morgan Christen also pointed out that Hallatt bought the Trader Joe’s goods he resold in Washington state. Hallatt’s attorney, Nathan Alexander, said in …

Canadians switched at birth in second case at hospital

Two men in a remote community in Canada have found out they were switched at birth 41 years ago.Leon Swanson and David Tait Jr know each other and continue to live in the same town of 5,000 people, who are mostly indigenous from the Cree Nation.This is the second such case to come to light in a year.Canada’s health minister said it was an “important reminder” of the “urgent need to provide all indigenous people with high-quality health care”.Mr Tait and Mr Swanson were swapped in the government-run Norway House Hospital in 1975.DNA testing has confirmed that they …
Go to Source

Ex-PM Stephen Harper quits Canada politics

Former Prime Minister Stephen Harper has given up his seat as an MP, leaving Canadian politics after more than 20 years to focus on his businesses.The news comes 10 months after Mr Harper lost the election to Justin Trudeau and then resigned as Conservative leader.He said representing Calgary in Parliament had been an honour.He was first elected as a Reform MP in 1993 and later led the Conservative Party to three election victories.In a written statement, he said: “Friends, we did a lot together, but I know the best is yet to come.”Our country must continue to serve as a model of prosperity and freedom.”Three election wins, no shortage of controversyFive things Stephen Harper got wrong He listed his achievements as cutting taxes and balancing the national budget. “We got tough on crime and put families first. We managed our G7 economy through the worst global recession …

Canadian couple forced to live apart after 62 years

An elderly Canadian couple who have been married for 62 years have been forced to live in separate care homes.A photo of Wolfram Gottschalk, 83, and his wife, Anita, 81, went viral after their granddaughter shared their story.Ashley Baryik, 29 said her grandparents have been separated because there is no room for both of them at the same home in Surrey, British Columbia.Mr Gottschalk, who has been diagnosed with lymphoma, is on a waiting list to move into the same home as his wife.In a Facebook post on Tuesday, Ms Baryik posted a touching image of her “Omi and Opi” …
Go to Source

TD, CIBC continue strong performance by Canada's banks

* CRO says income checks have been tightened up* TD adjusted EPS C$1.27 vs average C$1.21 forecast* CEO says continuing to look for U.S. acquisitions

(Adds comments from executives on conference call)By Matt ScuffhamTORONTO, Aug 25 Toronto-Dominion Bank
has made changes to its mortgage underwriting practices in
recent years, its chief risk officer said on Thursday,
potentially making it more resilient if house prices fall in
Vancouver and Toronto.

Canada’s banks are facing heightened scrutiny of their
mortgage underwriting practices as authorities try to tackle the
potential threat of a housing bubble in the two cities, where
prices have soared.The country’s banking regulator last month raised concerns
about mortgage underwriting standards across the industry,
citing income verification checks as a concern.Speaking to investors after the bank reported
better-than-expected third-quarter results, TD’s Chief Risk
Officer Mark Chauvin said Canada’s second-biggest lender had
already tightened checks in response to price …

Three dead in street attack in Canada

Three people have been killed in Toronto, with one of the fatalities believed to be caused by a crossbow, say police.Attending to a reported stabbing in the Scarborough area, police found two people dead and one person wounded. The injured person later died.One person is in custody and a crossbow was found in the vicinity.One of the victims suffered injuries consistent with a crossbow, a police official told Canadian media.Constable Jennifer Sidhu, a Toronto police spokeswoman, told the BBC that police received reports of a stabbing incident and arrived just before 1300 EST (1800 GMT) to find the …
Go to Source

Canada may ask oil firms to pay extra for far-offshore drilling: memo




By Ethan Lou



TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada may ask oil companies to contribute to the hundreds of millions of dollars or more the country has to pay to an international body if they drill far offshore, according to an internal government memo.



If that happens, it could make the operations more expensive and strain talks that companies will have with provincial governments, which already require them to pay royalties.



A United Nations convention, which Canada ratified in 2003, says signatories need to pay the International Seabed Authority (ISA) if companies drill on the “extended continental shelf,” the seabed part of a country’s landmass, but more than 200 nautical miles (230 miles) offshore.



It was never clear from where that money should come. The ISA said only that Canada, where Norway’s Statoil ASA STL.OL has done such far-offshore explorations, is close to a position that warrants payments under the United Nations Convention on …
Go to Source